Personal trainer Rachael Attard reveals what happens to your body when you give up carbohydrates

A personal trainer has revealed what really happens to your body when you give up carbohydrates, and the positive and negative effects you can expect from cutting them out almost entirely.

Rachael Attard, from Sydney, explained that while a low-carb diet can be beneficial for many body types looking to lose weight, it can also cause some difficult side effects, including headaches, indigestion and short-term fatigue.

Rather than cutting them out altogether, Rachael explained that a better approach is to limit your intake of specific carbohydrates and time them when you exercise so that your body uses the energy effectively.

A personal trainer has revealed what really happens to your body when you give up carbohydrates, and the positives and negatives you can expect (Rachael Attard pictured)

Rather than cutting out carbs (pictured) altogether, Rachael explained that a better approach is to limit your intake of specific carbs and time them when you're working out.

Rather than cutting out carbs (pictured) altogether, Rachael explained that a better approach is to limit your intake of specific carbs and time them when you’re working out.

“Carbohydrates are essential to your health and it’s very hard to avoid them completely,” Rachael wrote on her website.

“They are your body’s energy source and when you eat carbohydrates, your body breaks down the sugars and starches into comparable sugars.”

In addition to providing mental and physical energy, Rachael said carbohydrates are also invaluable for your digestion, aiding in weight management and providing nutrients for your immune system.

She said most experts agree that you should get between 45 and 60 percent of your calories from carbohydrates each day.

The three different types of carbohydrates explained

* starch: Starch is considered a complex carbohydrate because it consists of numerous sugar units bonded together. You can find starch in plant foods, such as vegetables, grains, and cooked dry beans and peas. They provide a slower form of energy than simple carbohydrates and are used rather than stored as fat.

* FIBER: Fiber is another form of complex carbohydrate. There are two types of fiber: soluble and insoluble. Soluble fiber dissolves in your body. It becomes a gel-like substance and it lowers blood sugar and lowers blood cholesterol. Insoluble fiber does not dissolve. Instead, it helps food move quickly through your digestive system. This type of fiber helps you stay regular.

* SUGAR: Sugar is a simple carbohydrate and passes quickly through the body. In general, it is easy for your body to digest and absorb sugar. This allows sugars to give you a quick energy boost that burns out quickly. Sugars also raise your blood sugar.

Source: Rachel Attard

Rachael said there are benefits to reducing your carb intake, including fat burning, reduced risk of health problems and increased focus (a customer transformation pictured)

Rachael said there are benefits to reducing your carbohydrate intake, including fat burning, reduced risk of health problems and increased focus (a customer transformation pictured)

What are the benefits of a low-carb diet?

Burn fat

Reducing the amount of carbohydrates you eat or just eating complex carbohydrates that your body can use for energy has many benefits, the most important of which is fat burning.

“Studies show that people who follow a low-carb diet tend to lose significant amounts of fat and build muscle,” explains Rachael.

Low-carb diets are particularly good at targeting fat around your abdominal area.

The reason reducing your carbs helps is because when you reduce your carbs, you lower our body’s insulin levels, which causes the body to store fat.

A good way to cut your carbs is to focus on a keto-based diet that prioritizes fat over carbs.

Reduced risk of health problems

The second benefit of reducing your carbohydrate intake is a reduced risk of health problems.

“Low-carb diets have been linked to a lower risk of several health problems and diseases, including heart disease, type 2 diabetes, metabolic syndrome and Parkinson’s disease,” Rachael said.

This is often because when you eat fewer carbohydrates, you end up incorporating more healthy foods like vegetables into your diet.

More focus and clarity

Those who cut or reduce their carbs can expect increased focus and mental clarity, after a brief bout of fatigue akin to brain fog.

“Getting rid of simple carbohydrates can also be a great way to improve your energy levels,” Rachael said.

“When you eat simple carbs, you tend to get a boost of energy — and then a slump. Eating only complex carbohydrates instead will help balance this out and give you a more stable source of energy.”

On the other hand, when you first reduce your carbohydrate intake, you can feel sick with something often referred to as the

On the other hand, when you first reduce your carbohydrate intake, you can feel sick with something often referred to as the “keto flu,” Rachael said (pictured)

What are the disadvantages of a low-carb diet?

‘keto flu’

On the other hand, when you first reduce your carbohydrate intake, you may feel nauseous with something often referred to as the “keto flu.”

“This is not an official medical disease and doctors don’t know exactly why it happens,” Rachael said.

Some common symptoms include fatigue, brain fog, headaches, bad breath, trouble sleeping and sugar cravings.

The good news is that people typically get over their “keto flu” within a week if they can overcome the cravings and exhaustion.

Bad breath

The PT explained that bad breath is a common side effect of restricting carbohydrates, but there is a very simple explanation.

‘The bad breath is caused by an increase in the acetone level. Acetone is a ketone that leaves your body through your breath and urine,” she said.

Rachael (pictured) warned there are safe ways to cut your carbs, including limiting refined carbs and grains and opting for protein-rich snacks and foods like meat and cheese

Rachael (pictured) warned there are safe ways to cut your carbs, including limiting refined carbs and grains and opting for protein-rich snacks and foods like meat and cheese

Digestive Problems

How To Effectively Reduce Your Carbohydrate Intake?

* Limit refined carbohydrates and grains from things like bread.

* Limit sugar-sweetened drinks such as fruit juice, energy drinks, soda and flavored coffee – which are often high in carbohydrates.

* Opt for low-carb, high-protein foods and snacks such as meat, cheese, Greek yogurt, eggs, and nuts.

* Read food labels to understand what you are putting into your body.

* Consult your GP or GP if you are considering reducing carbohydrates.

You may also notice increased digestive problems when you reduce your carbohydrates.

‘Constipation and diarrhea are common side effects of a low-carbohydrate diet. These problems may improve after a few weeks, but some people continue to struggle with digestive problems the entire time they are on this diet,” Rachael said.

To fix it, you may need to eat low-carb vegetables that contain fiber.

It’s not a good idea to cut out all carbohydrates completely.

How can I safely reduce my carbohydrate intake?

While it may seem difficult, there are ways you can safely reduce your carbohydrate intake.

Rachael said the types of carbohydrates you want to avoid are those that come from refined carbohydrates and grains, as well as sugar-sweetened drinks such as fruit juice, energy drinks, soda and flavored coffee.

The PT recommends eating as many low-carb snacks in a day as possible, such as hard-boiled eggs, nuts, and cheese.

You should also look for foods that are high in protein to help you feel full, such as cheese, Greek yogurt, meats, eggs, and nuts.

“One of the best ways to limit your carbohydrate intake is by not accidentally eating them. Read food labels to understand what you’re putting in your body,” Rachael said.

If you want to eat fewer carbohydrates, the PT recommends that you consult your primary care physician or primary care physician.

To learn more about Rachael Attard, you can visit her Instagram profile here.

.