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Personal trainer, 33, claims that the doctor refused to remove her breast implants because this would ruin the figure

A personal trainer who had her breast implants removed after a series of illnesses has shown that doctors were reluctant to perform the procedure because they feared it would ruin her figure.

Bec Donlan, 33, a fitness trainer and entrepreneur originally from Australia but living in New York, was born with pectus excavatum – a concave chest wall – and decided at the age of 22 to receive Biocell implants after a series of comments about her appearance she felt self-conscious.

However, when the fitness influencer repeatedly woke up with her chest inflamed, she considered removing the implants.

“Doctors told me they wouldn’t do it because it wouldn’t look good,” she said Really yourself. “One even said,” You have a Sports Illustrated body and I make you look terrible, so I don’t do it. “

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Bec Donlan, who lives in New York, had a breast enlargement at the age of 22, after comments about her ribs visible in her chest gave her a self-conscious feeling (in the photo before the implants were removed)

Bec Donlan, who lives in New York, had a breast enlargement at the age of 22, after comments about her ribs visible in her chest gave her a self-conscious feeling (in the photo before the implants were removed)

Bec (now pictured) says she had her textured Biocell implants removed after experiencing a series of illnesses

Bec (now pictured) says she had her textured Biocell implants removed after experiencing a series of illnesses

Bec (now pictured) says she had her textured Biocell implants removed after experiencing a series of illnesses

Bec – who is the founder of Sweat With Bec – says she chose to have a breast augmentation after having her brother, who also suffers from the same condition, put on ‘barbaric’ metal bars.

“Everything was fine for three years, and then one morning I suddenly woke up with an insane amount of fluid around one of my implants – that breast was twice the size of the other,” she explained.

Doctors struggled to identify the cause and believed that this might be due to a bacterial infection.

A few years later, however, the same problem occurred again, along with a few stomach problems.

Bec (born in the photo), born with pectus excavatum, said she was happy with her implants for the first few years, but then began to experience problems, including chronic fatigue

Bec (born in the photo), born with pectus excavatum, said she was happy with her implants for the first few years, but then began to experience problems, including chronic fatigue

Bec (born in the photo), born with pectus excavatum, said she was happy with her implants for the first few years, but then began to experience problems, including chronic fatigue

The 33-year-old (pictured earlier) was worried that her health problems were related to her implants after she had been told that they had been recalled

The 33-year-old (pictured earlier) was worried that her health problems were related to her implants after she had been told that they had been recalled

The 33-year-old (pictured earlier) was worried that her health problems were related to her implants after she had been told that they had been recalled

It wasn’t long before Bec’s health deteriorated and she began to experience chronic fatigue, hair loss, and menstruation so badly that she couldn’t leave her bed.

“I found out in July 2019 that my implants had been recalled,” she explained. “I reached out to my original plastic surgeon and he said,” You’re okay, there’s nothing wrong with them, don’t take them out for no reason. ”

Breast implant disease

  • BII is a term used by women who have breast implants who themselves identify and describe a number of symptoms that they think are directly related to their saline or silicone, textured or smooth breast implants.
  • Symptoms include fatigue, chest pain, hair loss and headache chills, photosensitivity, chronic pain, skin rash, body odor, anxiety, brain fog, sleep disorders, depression, neurological problems and hormonal problems.
  • There is currently no definitive epidemiological evidence that supports a direct link between breast implants and a specific disease process.

Source: American Society for Aesthetic Plastic Surgery

But after he awoke months later with an inflamed chest, a hospital doctor urged the fitness influencer to remove the implants as quickly as possible.

She claims that some medical experts with whom she spoke about having the implants removed were hesitant because they believed it would not look good.

The personal trainer finally decided to undergo the procedure with board-certified plastic surgeon Dr. T. Y. Steven Ip based in California.

The personal trainer claimed he was honest that “it wouldn’t look great,” but discussed the possibility of fat transfer options instead of re-implants.

“Seeing myself after the explant was … a lot. It’s not cute – it’s a very deflated situation. But it was crazy how much better I felt right away, “she said.

Bec claims that her skin improved and the whites of her eyes became clearer within hours of the removal of the implants – despite doctors who said it could take months for her to heal.

Bec (in the photo after the operation) said that some doctors she consulted hesitated to remove the implants because she would not look good

Bec (in the photo after the operation) said that some doctors she consulted hesitated to remove the implants because she would not look good

Bec (in the photo after the operation) said that some doctors she consulted hesitated to remove the implants because she would not look good

Bec (photo opposite) claimed that her eyes became clearer and her skin improved within hours after the implants were removed

Bec (photo opposite) claimed that her eyes became clearer and her skin improved within hours after the implants were removed

Bec (photo opposite) claimed that her eyes became clearer and her skin improved within hours after the implants were removed

Bec (photo on the right) has documented her recovery on Instagram hoping to help others in similar situations

Bec (photo on the right) has documented her recovery on Instagram hoping to help others in similar situations

Bec (photo on the right) has documented her recovery on Instagram hoping to help others in similar situations

Now she has shared her experiences on Instagram with its 56,000 followers hoping to help others in the same situation.

Many have provided reassurance in response to photos that Bec posted after removing the implants.

‘So awesome! You look fantastic! I have noticed in your stories how healthy your eyes, skin and overall face look. No more eye drops! praised one, while a second wrote:

‘You look as fantastic as ever! And so happy that you recover well. Strong woman!’

A third added: “Beautiful! Way to stand in your truth and beauty! “

An Allergan spokesperson who produces Biocell implants told MailOnline: “Patient safety is Allergan’s highest priority.

“The safety and quality of our breast implants is something that we follow very closely, through post-approval and surveillance studies, as well as patient-reported data, and we report this data directly to global regulatory authorities.”

A stream of reactions on Instagram comes from those who offer Bec reassurance and wish her a quick recovery

A stream of reactions on Instagram comes from those who offer Bec reassurance and wish her a quick recovery

A stream of reactions on Instagram comes from those who offer Bec reassurance and wish her a quick recovery

HISTORY OF BREAST IMPLANTS IN THE USA

1960: Breast implants were first sold in the US before the FDA regulated medical devices.

1976: The law has been amended, meaning that every medical device would be classified in class I, II or III.

Those in the highest class (Class III) would require the strictest controls – primarily: human clinical trials.

Breast implants, which became more and more popular, were allowed to stay on the market while the FDA decided which category it should take.

But doctors began to express concerns that the devices seemed to cause side effects.

1978: An FDA advisory panel suggested that class II breast implants should be.

1982: The FDA decided that breast implants should be class III. They called on the industry to conduct human studies to investigate a few major issues:

  • the risk of breakage
  • the risk of leaks
  • contraction of scars
  • that they are difficult to mammograms
  • left to lupus
  • links to cancer

1990: Congressmen criticized the industry for not presenting human trials. The only tests to date have been silicone injections in rats and rabbits.

1991: The industry has submitted human studies, but these were considered to be of poor quality. One lasted only three months.

1992: Internal documents from people from the then industry leader, Dow Corning, were leaked to the press, indicating that manufacturers were worried about risks to human health.

That was the nail in the box. The FDA decided to ban silicone implants for women unless they participated in ‘additional’ tests to assess their safety.

2003/4: The FDA rejected the data presented by Inamed (now Allergan) and Mentor (now part of J&J) and said they were of poor quality. Seventy-five percent of the women left the Mentor process before their first follow-up.

The FDA then published guidelines on what the tests should consist of. They had to answer why implants break, leak and how long implants last.

2005: Mentor and Inamed submitted three-year studies, which were criticized as insufficient by the FDA.

2006: The FDA has re-approved silicone implants, but has instructed device manufacturers to conduct six 10-year trials with at least 40,000 women.

2011: No data has been published. The National Center for Health Research, a patient interest group, lobbyed for congresses. The FDA published data online later that year, indicating that the investigations had not been completed. Three quarters of the women stopped the Mentor study and 40 percent stopped the Allergan study.

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