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Adults will say anything on dates if they think there is a chance of sex - including fibbing about the number of previous partners they have had - found a study (stock image)

People will & # 39; just about everything & # 39; say to make them look better for an attractive stranger if they think sex is at stake, the study says

  • Researchers divided 635 heterosexual student volunteers into two groups
  • One group was prepared with sexual stimuli and the other neutral stimuli
  • Both groups then entered into a debate with a stranger of the opposite sex
  • Sexually primed people were more likely to change attitudes to make an impression
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Adults will say anything on dates if they think there is a chance of sex – including fibbing about the number of previous partners they have had – found a study.

The process is perhaps unconscious, but researchers say that sex in the brain really influences how we present ourselves to attractive strangers.

This can manifest itself as apparently changing attitudes or agreeing with statements that one would normally oppose in what psychologists & # 39; misleading self-presentation & # 39; to mention.

When a person tries to impress or chat with someone, the brain switches to a kind of mental – rather than physical – excitement, the researchers argue.

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Adults will say anything on dates if they think there is a chance of sex - including fibbing about the number of previous partners they have had - found a study (stock image)

Adults will say anything on dates if they think there is a chance of sex – including fibbing about the number of previous partners they have had – found a study (stock image)

& # 39; When the possibility of sex looms up, people are more likely to change attitudes and put on misleading self-presentations & # 39 ;, the researchers wrote.

& # 39; In other words, they conform, beautify and sometimes lie. & # 39;

In the study, the research team conducted an experiment with 634 heterosexual students with an average age of 25, which they divided into two groups.

Members of one group were first exposed to & # 39; sexual stimuli & # 39; – and the other group to & # 39; neutral stimuli & # 39; – before they came in contact with a stranger of the opposite sex.

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They were then given scenarios in which they would take one point of view and the other person would do the opposite – such as debating about accepting a job abroad or refusing to stay close to friends and family.

The researchers discovered that those exposed to sexual stimuli were more inclined to change their argument and agree with the opposite view in the hope of making a good impression and increasing their chances of sex.

The sexual priming caused the brain & # 39; sexual & # 39; began to think, said paper author and psychologist Harry Reis of the University of Rochester in New York.

& # 39; Technical (priming) means activating a certain set of concepts in the brain, so that parts of the brain that represent sexuality are activated, & # 39; he remarked.

& # 39; But that doesn't necessarily mean that people get genetically excited. & # 39;

& # 39; When the possibility of sex looms up, people are more likely to change attitudes and put on misleading self-presentation & # 39 ;, the researchers wrote (stock image)
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& # 39; When the possibility of sex looms up, people are more likely to change attitudes and put on misleading self-presentation & # 39 ;, the researchers wrote (stock image)

& # 39; When the possibility of sex looms up, people are more likely to change attitudes and put on misleading self-presentation & # 39 ;, the researchers wrote (stock image)

In a second experiment, volunteers were asked to give their opinion on a number of issues before they got the profile of a member of the opposite sex with whom they would communicate in an online chat.

Each participant was asked to compile a profile and e-mail it to the other person in which he and his vIews.

As with the first experiment, the researchers discovered that the group that had been sexually prepared changed their views in their e-mail profile to more closely match the person they were about to chat with.

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& # 39; The desire to impress a potential partner is particularly intense when it comes to preferences central to establishing an intimate bond & # 39 ;, the researchers said.

& # 39; Such attitude changes can be seen as a subtle exaggeration or as a harmless step to impress or be closer to a potential partner. & # 39;

The researchers discovered that another lie that people told when meeting an attractive stranger was to reduce their reported number of previous sexual partners.

Seven was the most chosen number of partners in these fabrications.

& # 39; People will do and say anything to make a connection with an attractive stranger, & # 39; said paper author and psychologist Gurit Birnbaum of the Interdisciplinary Center Herzliya in Israel.

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& # 39; When your sexual system is activated, you are motivated to present yourself in the best possible light. & # 39;

& # 39; That means you tell strange things that make you look better than you really are. & # 39;

The full findings of the study were published in the Journal of Experimental Social Psychology.

WHAT ARE THE NINE WAYS TO FIND A LIAR?

The big break: Lying is a fairly complex process for the body and brain. First your brain produces the truth that it must then suppress before the lie and the execution of that lie are invented.

This often leads to a longer pause than normal for answering, plus a verbal blocking technique such as & # 39; Why do you ask? & # 39; Instead of a direct and open response.

The eye arrow: People have more eye expressions than any other animal and our eyes can give away when we try to hide something.

If we look up to the left of us to think that we often have access to the recalled memory, but if our eyes roll up to the right, we can think more creatively. The fault of a lie also causes people to often use eye contact, such as looking down or looking away.

The lost breath: Bending the truth causes an immediate stress response in most people, which means that the fight or flight mechanisms are activated.

The mouth dries, the body sweats more, the heartbeat speeds up and the rhythm of breathing changes into shorter, more superficial breaths that are often both visible and audible.

overcompensating: A liar will often perform too much, both speaking and gesturing too much in an attempt to be more convincing. These exaggerated rituals in body language can involve too much eye contact (often without blinking!) And too emphatic gestures.

The more someone gesticulates, the more likely it is that they are fibbing (stock image)
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The more someone gesticulates, the more likely it is that they are fibbing (stock image)

The more someone gesticulates, the more likely it is that they are fibbing (stock image)

The poker face: Although some people prefer to use the poker face, many assume that less is more and almost halted in terms of movement and eye contact when they are careful with the truth.

The face hides: When someone tells a lie, they often have a strong desire to hide their faces from their audience. This can lead to a partially cut off gesture such as the well-known nose touch or mouth cover.

Self-comfort touches: The stress and discomfort of lying often produces gestures aimed at comforting the liar, such as rocking, stroking her or twiddling or playing with wedding rings. We all tend to use self-comfort gestures, but this will increase dramatically when someone is breeding.

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Micro gestures: These are very small gestures or facial expressions that can flash across the face so quickly that they are hard to see. Experts often use filmed images that are then delayed to catch the actual response of the body language that pops up in the middle of the executed lie.

The best time to see it in real life is to look for the facial expression that occurs after the liar is spoken. The mouth may skew or the eyes roll away in an instant.

Heckling hands: The most difficult parts of the body to work with are hands or feet, and liars often have trouble keeping them informed while they are lying.

When the gestures and the words are at odds, this is called incongruent gestures and it is often the hands or feet that tell the truth.

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