People who survive severe COVID are 2.5 times more likely to die within a year than those who are not infected

Lung Covid may lead to an increased risk of death in the year after a patient’s diagnosis, a new study finds.

Researchers from the University of Florida analyzed health records of more than 13,000 patients and followed them for 12 months.

Patients with severe Covid symptoms were 2.5 times more likely to die the following year after their diagnosis compared to those who tested negative for Covid.

Younger patients (under age 65) who suffered from severe symptoms had a particularly high risk of death with a 3.3 times greater chance of dying than patients under age 65 who tested negative.

The study indicates there is “a significant risk of dying” from unrecognized Covid complications, the study’s lead author said. Vaccination can prevent such complications.

Patients hospitalized with severe Covid symptoms have an increased risk of dying - from all causes - in the coming year, a new study finds.  Pictured: Health workers treat a Covid patient in an ICU in Tarzana, California, September 2021

Patients hospitalized with severe Covid symptoms have an increased risk of dying – from all causes – in the coming year, a new study finds. Pictured: Health workers treat a Covid patient in an ICU in Tarzana, California, September 2021

It is now known among scientists and doctors that Covid infections can lead to symptoms for many weeks or months after patients are first diagnosed.

The long-term condition, called lung Covid, is estimated to affect between 10 and 30 percent of people infected with the coronavirus, according to the National Institutes of Health.

Symptoms can come in a wide rangefrom coughing and shortness of breath to fatigue, diarrhea, menstrual problems, new allergies and more.

Some long-term Covid patients have had symptoms for more than a year and a half.

A new study suggests that, in addition to long-term symptoms, prolonged Covid may lead to an increased risk of death within the first year of a patient’s diagnosis.

For the study, published Wednesday in the journal Limits in Medicine, researchers at the University of Florida used anonymous medical records to track 13,600 patients for 12 months after their Covid tests or related doctor visits.

“We conducted a previous study that found that patients with severe Covid who recovered had a significantly greater risk of being hospitalized over the following six months,” said Dr Arch Mainous, the study’s lead author, in a statement. .

“This new study expanded that to examine mortality risk over the next 12 months,” he said.

Of the 13,600 patients enrolled in Mainous and colleagues’ study, 424 had Covid cases, confirmed with positive PCR test results.

Of those, 178 had serious Covid problems, meaning they were hospitalized within 30 days of their initial diagnosis.

The other 13,200 patients in the study tested negative for Covid.

About 2,700 patients in the study died during the 12-month analysis period.

Long-term Covid patients may experience a number of different symptoms ranging from coughing and shortness of breath to fatigue, diarrhea, menstrual problems, new allergies and more

Long-term Covid patients may experience a number of different symptoms ranging from coughing and shortness of breath to fatigue, diarrhea, menstrual problems, new allergies and more

Long-term Covid patients may experience a number of different symptoms ranging from coughing and shortness of breath to fatigue, diarrhea, menstrual problems, new allergies and more

Overall, the death risk was “significantly higher” for the patients with severe Covid compared to those with mild cases or no infection, the researchers found.

Patients with severe Covid were 2.5 times more likely to die within 12 months of their diagnosis compared to those who did not test positive.

Severe Covid patients were also 1.9 times more likely to die within 12 months than those with mild Covid.

Patients under 65 with severe Covid had an even higher risk of dying within a year, compared with those in that age group who were not infected.

These patients were 3.3 times more likely to die within 12 months of diagnosis than Covid-negative patients under the age of 65, and 2.8 times more likely to die than mild Covid patients in the age group.

Meanwhile, severe Covid patients over 65 were 2.2 times more likely to die within 12 months than Covid-negative patients over 65, and 1.4 times more likely to die than seniors with mild Covid.

This trend is unusual as typically older Covid patients are at greater risk of dying from the virus.

Only 20 percent of deaths occurred from causes typically associated with Covid, such as blood clotting or respiratory failure.

This led the researchers to suggest that Covid could cause other, potentially fatal, long-term symptoms.

“Because we now know that there is a significant risk of dying from what is likely considered an unrecognized complication of Covid, we need to be even more vigilant in reducing severe episodes of Covid,” Mainous said.

“Taking chances and hoping for successful hospital treatment does not give the full picture of the impact of Covid,” he continued.

“Our recommendation at the moment is to take preventive measures, such as vaccination, to prevent severe episodes of Covid.”

Numerous studies have shown that vaccination reduces patients’ risk of severe Covid symptoms, hospitalization and long-term Covid.

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