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People who have had coronavirus can safely see others after 10 days without symptoms, the CDC says

Coronavirus patients can safely see others within 10 days of symptoms starting if they have improved or been fever-free for three days, CDC’s new guidelines say

  • People with the coronavirus are allowed to meet others after going without a fever for at least three days, new CDC guidelines say
  • They can also see each other safely when it’s been 10 days since they first noticed symptoms
  • The CDC says this is not a substitute for other practices such as good hand hygiene and social distance
  • In the US, there are more than 1.6 million confirmed cases of the virus and more than 98,000 deaths
  • Here’s how you can help people affected by Covid-19

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) have updated their guidelines for when people who have had the new coronavirus can safely see others.

The new recommendations allow patients to meet with others after they have left without a fever for at least three days.

In addition, their symptoms must have improved and at least 10 days must have passed since they first noticed the symptoms.

The updated guidelines come when states begin to reopen their economies and people begin to consider going back to work and school.

People with coronavirus are allowed to meet others after going without a fever for at least three days, new CDC guidelines say. Pictured: A person wears a protective face mask in Madison Square Park during the Coronavirus pandemic in New York City, May 24

People with coronavirus are allowed to meet others after going without a fever for at least three days, new CDC guidelines say. Pictured: A person wears a protective face mask in Madison Square Park during the Coronavirus pandemic in New York City, May 24

They can also see each other safely when it's been 10 days since they first noticed symptoms. Pictured: A nurse wears personal protective equipment while caring for a COVID-19 patient at ICU at Regional Medical Center in San Jose, California, May 21

They can also see each other safely when it's been 10 days since they first noticed symptoms. Pictured: A nurse wears personal protective equipment while caring for a COVID-19 patient at ICU at Regional Medical Center in San Jose, California, May 21

They can also see each other safely when it’s been 10 days since they first noticed symptoms. Pictured: A nurse wears personal protective equipment while caring for a COVID-19 patient at ICU at Regional Medical Center in San Jose, California, May 21

The CDC says people who test positive for the virus are still contagious, so waiting 10 days helps the symptoms pass.

“People with conditions that weaken their immune systems may need to stay at home for more than ten days,” the federal health service said.

If you’re exposed to someone with a confirmed case of the virus, stay home for at least 14 days to see if symptoms develop.

“Depending on your healthcare provider’s advice and the availability of tests, you may be tested to see if you still have COVID-19,” the CDC wrote.

“If you’re being tested, you can be around others if you don’t have a fever, symptoms have improved, and you get two negative test results in a row, at least 24 hours apart.”

However, not having symptoms or testing negative is not a substitute for practices such as social distance and good hand hygiene.

“Limit touching often-touched surfaces such as kiosks, digital interfaces such as touchscreens and fingerprint scanners, ticket machines, turnstiles, handrails, toilet surfaces, elevator buttons, and benches,” the CDC wrote.

“If you need to touch these surfaces as soon as possible, wash your hands with soap and water for 20 seconds or rub your hands with a disinfectant that contains 60% alcohol,” it adds.

The agency also recommends using contactless payments and trash cans with foot pedals where possible.

If you’re using a taxi or a ride share, the CDC recommends opening windows to improve air circulation inside the vehicle.

“Limit the number of passengers in the vehicle to only the necessary ones,” the agency said.

Avoid pooled or multi-passenger rides that are not in the same household. Sit in the rear seats in larger vehicles such as vans and buses, so you can stay at least six feet from the driver. ‘

If you’re taking public transportation, the CDC recommends driving off-peak hours, traveling six feet apart, and cleaning your hands regularly.

In the US, there are more than 1.6 million confirmed cases of the virus and more than 98,000 deaths.

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