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People who can afford exciting experiences think they’ve lived longer, study reveals

Studies have shown that wealthy people live longer, but new research suggests it may be their new experiences that lead them to believe they do.

A team from the Norwegian University of Science and the Kavli Institute for Systems Neuroscience discovered a network of brain cells that express our sense of time in experiences and memories.

The team found that pleasurable experiences, such as vacations and hobbies, create “time codes” in the brain that are more memorable and easier to remember than boring events, making it seem like we’ve been on Earth longer.

On the other hand, their work also shows that the brain typically doesn’t stamp out events that are mundane or constantly repeated, leaving us less to look back on.

Researchers suggest that when you recall a memory of driving to a tropical island or spending an afternoon tinkering with a vintage car, life “feels longer in retrospect.”

The team found that pleasurable experiences, such as vacations and hobbies, create “time codes” in the brain that are more memorable and easier to remember than boring events, making it seem like we’ve been on Earth longer. If you remember a memory of driving to a tropical island or spending an afternoon tinkering with a classic car, life feels ‘in retrospect’

Valtteri told Arstila, a professor of philosophy at the University of Helsinki National Geographic: “I think the most important thing is that rich people have the opportunity to get out of their daily routine.”

Researchers from the Norwegian University of Science and Kavli Institute for Systems found that the area of ​​the brain that creates these time codes is located in the medial entoral cortex.

They conducted experiments on two groups of rats while monitoring this area.

In one experiment, a rat was introduced to a wide variety of experiences and options for action.

A team from the Norwegian University of Science and the Kavli Institute for Systems Neuroscience discovered a network of brain cells that express our sense of time in experiences and memories.

A team from the Norwegian University of Science and the Kavli Institute for Systems Neuroscience discovered a network of brain cells that express our sense of time in experiences and memories.

A team from the Norwegian University of Science and the Kavli Institute for Systems Neuroscience discovered a network of brain cells that express our sense of time in experiences and memories.

It was free to run around, examine pieces of chocolate and hunt while visiting a range of open space environments.

PhD student Jørgen Sugar said: “ The uniqueness of the time signal during this experiment suggests that the rat had a very good timekeeping and temporal sequence of events during the two hours of the experiment. ”

“We were able to use the signal from the time-coding network to keep track of exactly when different events took place in the experiment.”

In the second experiment, the task was more structured with a smaller range of experiences and options for action.

The rat was trained to chase pieces of chocolate while spinning left or right in a figure-eight maze.

Albert Tsao of Kavli Institute for Systems Neuroscience said, “With this activity, we saw the time-coding signal change character from unique sequences over time to a repeating and partially overlapping pattern.”

On the other hand, the time signal became more precise and predictable during the repetitive task.

According to Sugar, the data shows that the brain is unwilling to waste time remembering dull moments.

So the rats seemed to create more memories when engaged in free or varied actions, rather than something that is clear and predictable, he added.

Sugar also explained to National Geographic that there are differences in what short-term memory feels like at the moment.

They conducted experiments on two groups of rats while monitoring this area. The rats seemed to create more memories when they took part in free or varied actions, rather than something that is obvious and predictable.

They conducted experiments on two groups of rats while monitoring this area. The rats seemed to create more memories when they participated in free or varied actions, rather than something that is obvious and predictable.

They conducted experiments on two groups of rats while monitoring this area. The rats seemed to create more memories when they took part in free or varied actions, rather than something that is obvious and predictable.

He gives the example of students who attended two different lectures: one was boring and the other interesting.

The student in the boring conversation watched time go by while the other thought he was flying.

In recalling both events, the dull class created fewer timecodes that the brain deleted after a period of time.

The interesting lecture was full of memories and felt longer afterwards.

However, other experts not involved in the study are not convinced.

Adrian Bejan, a professor of thermodynamics at Duke University, said the novelty of exciting experiences will eventually wear off and the wealth doesn’t have the power to trick time to slow down.

Benja told National Geographic that while taking fun outings can slow time a bit, it will lose its charm.

The wealthy person will get bored at some point and want to go back to the office, which will speed up time again.

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