People who become reinfected with Covid are 90% less likely to be hospitalized and die from the virus

People who are re-infected with COVID-19 are less likely to be hospitalized or die than during the initial infection, a new study suggests.

Researchers looked at waves of infection that hit Qatar in the spring of 2020 and then two consecutive waves in the winter of 2021 and spring of 2021.

They found that patients who contracted Covid a second time were 90 percent less likely to become seriously or seriously ill — or die — than primary infections.

The joint team, from the Qatar Ministry of Health and Weill Cornell Medicine – Qatar, says the findings provide evidence that reinfection is rare and that getting seriously ill is even rarer.

A new study found that four people, 0.3%, with a reinfection became seriously ill, compared with 2.5% of those with a primary infection. None of the people in the reinfection group became seriously ill or died from COVID-19, compared to 0.4% and 0.1%, respectively, in the initial infection group (above)

For the study, published in The New England Journal of Medicine On Wednesday, the team looked at more than 353,000 people infected with COVID-19 between February 28, 2020 and April 28, 2021.

The study period is divided into three waves: the first wave from February 2020 to June 2020; the second wave caused by the Alpha variant from January to March 2020; and the third wave caused by the Beta variant from March 2021 to May 2021.

Researchers identified 1,300 people who had been re-infected with COVD-19 and linked five primary infections to factors such as gender, age and nationality.

The median time between the patient’s first illness and their reinfection was nine months.

They found that only four people, 0.3 percent, with a reinfection became seriously ill, compared with 2.5 percent of those with a primary infection.

In addition, 0.4 percent became seriously ill and 0.1 percent died in the primary infection group.

In comparison, no people became seriously ill or died in the reinfection group.

Overall, 3.1 percent of people had a serious, critical or fatal illness from COVID-19, compared to 0.3 percent in the reinfection group.

This translates into a 90 percent lower chance of being hospitalized, entering the intensive care unit, or dying with reinfection compared to a first infection.

There are some limitations to the study, including the fact that it was conducted in Qatar, which does not experience cold weather compared to much of the world.

Researchers say this shows that reinfection reduces the chance of hospitalization or death from Covid by 90%.  Pictured: A medical assistant administers a COVID-19 test to a person at Sameday Testing in Los Angeles, California, July 2021

Researchers say this shows that reinfection reduces the chance of hospitalization or death from Covid by 90%. Pictured: A medical assistant administers a COVID-19 test to a person at Sameday Testing in Los Angeles, California, July 2021

In addition, the researchers have not studied anyone infected with the Delta variant, which is now the dominant species circulating around the world.

However, there have been studies in the past that suggest that even mild Covid cases can leave patients with a strong infection.

Researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis looked at blood samples from 77 patients who previously had mild cases of COVID-19 and found that antibody levels had dropped within the first few months of infection, but increased to 11 months after some time. could be found. patients first tested positive.

It needs to be determined whether such protection against severe disease upon reinfection lasts for a longer period of time, analogous to the immunity that develops against other seasonal ‘cold’ coronaviruses, which elicit short-term immunity against mild reinfection but longer-term immunity. against more severe disease with reinfection,” the authors wrote.

“If this were the case with SARS-CoV-2, the virus (or at least the variants studied so far) could adopt a more benign infection pattern when it becomes endemic.”

dr. Kami Kim, the director of the Department of Infectious Diseases and International Medicine at the University of South Florida, said: CNN that everyone should still be vaccinated.

She added that people shouldn’t assume they won’t be reinfected if they catch COVID-19.

“It’s like asking the question: do you need airbags and seat belts?” Kim told CNN.

Just because you have airbags doesn’t mean seatbelts won’t help you and vice versa. It’s good to have the protection of both.”

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