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With the help of a laser, special American operations can identify subjects based on a unique heartbeat.

Pentagon has developed a laser that can identify subjects from hundreds of meters away based on their HEART RATE

  • Using a laser, the Pentagon can identify targets from afar to measure heartbeats
  • Technology is being developed for special US operations for surveillance
  • Infrared lasers can penetrate clothing and skin to track blood flow
  • Heart beats are completely unique as opposed to faces or even thumbprints
  • Prototypes currently have a range of around 200 meters or 219 yards
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American special forces take a more intimate & # 39; approach to remotely identifying targets, using lasers to feel their heartbeat.

According to MIT Technology Review, the Pentagon has developed a technology prototype, codenamed & # 39; Jetson & # 39 ;, which uses infrared lasers to read a person's heart drawing.

Although people's heartbeats are much less obvious than fingerprints or faces, they have a clear profile, making them one of the most useful biometrics for uniquely identifying a person.

With the help of a laser, special American operations can identify subjects based on a unique heartbeat.

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With the help of a laser, special American operations can identify subjects based on a unique heartbeat.

HOW CAN YOU BE IDENTIFIED BY YOUR HEART RATE?

Like fingerprints, faces and even the way you walk, heart beats have a unique signature.

With the help of senors, these cardiac profiles can be used in biometric protection and now: monitoring.

By using infrared lasers, the Pentagon has developed a laser that can read a person's heartbeat from 200 meters.

The technology can help identify insurgents in an active war zone and is more accurate than face recognition.

To make the method viable, American Special Forces would probably have to build a database.

What distinguishes the signature of others such as this, however, is the fact that, unlike a face that can have many similar characteristics to another, heart beats are completely different.

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As noted by MIT, companies such as Nymi are already using cardiac signatures – taken via a wrist sensor – to identify people for security purposes.

Another advantage that has made the type of detection particularly desirable for the US military is the use of lasers, which allows a relatively large range.

Current prototypes work from around 200 meters (219 yards) and with further adjustments this range can be expanded.

& # 39; I am not saying you can do it from space & # 39 ;, said Steward Remaly of the Pentagon Technical Support Office for Counter Terrorism to MIT. & # 39; But longer series must be possible. & # 39;

Heart rate patterns obtained by detecting the changes in infrared light caused by a person's blood flow are not only very accurate – about 95 to 98 percent – but also versatile.

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In contrast to face recognition, which may require clear view of a person's face or facial hair or other conditions, laser-detected heart beats can be captured through normal clothing and at a number of angles.

The method requires an invisible laser to be focused on a subject for about 30 seconds to get sufficient reading power, meaning that the technology can only be used by someone who is standing still.

Heartbeat detection can defeat the use of face recognition or other biometric methods of surveillance in range, accuracy and versatility.

Heartbeat detection can defeat the use of face recognition or other biometric methods of surveillance in range, accuracy and versatility.

Heartbeat detection can defeat the use of face recognition or other biometric methods of surveillance in range, accuracy and versatility.

In terms of applications, the military suggested that technology could be used to identify insurgents by tuning their heart beats to a drone.

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However, like any biometric database, the biggest obstacle to creating such a user reality would be to generate a database large enough to refer.

The technology can also find its way to more civilian applications such as hospitals where doctors would be able to monitor a patient's blood flow without ever having to hook someone to a machine.

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