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Penguins can fire their feces with such force that they are more than FOUR FEET removed

Penguins can shoot their feces out of their rectum with such force that they are more than FOUR FEET removed, scientists find

  • Penguins have a high ‘rectal pressure’ that can expel feces at some distance
  • This allows them to avoid soiling themselves and their nests with guano
  • Experts from Japan have calculated how far Humboldt penguins can propel poop
  • They found the equivalent of a human pooing 10 feet away

Much has been said recently about the safe social distance from each other. With penguins, however, ‘one meter’ is clearly not enough.

Experts from Japan have discovered that the waterfowl can shoot their feces out of their rectum with such force that they are more than four feet (1.2 meters) away.

Their high ‘rectal pressure’ – which sees shit flying at a speed of about 4.5 mph – allows penguins to keep both them and their nest untouched when they poop.

However, this dynamic release forces zookeepers to be wary of approaching penguins from behind when they visit their enclosures.

Experts from Japan have found that the waterfowl can fire their feces out of their rectum with such force that they can reach more than four feet away. Depicted, a Humboldt penguin

Experts from Japan have found that the waterfowl can fire their feces out of their rectum with such force that they can reach more than four feet away. Depicted, a Humboldt penguin

In their study, physicist Hiroyuki Tajima of Kochi University and Fumiya Fujisawa of Katsurahama Aquarium used to calculate how far Humboldt penguins can fire their poo – as well as the rectal pressure needed to accomplish such an achievement.

‘The flight distance of penguin feces is about 0.4 meters [1.3 feet] even on the ground, ‘the duo wrote in their newspaper.

While this may seem like only a short distance away, it matches the average height of Humboldt penguins themselves.

In addition, penguins usually nest on rocks raised about 2 meters above the ground, meaning their flowing guano can go even further.

“We discovered that penguin keepers had to keep a distance of more than 1.34 meters [4.4 feet] of penguins trying to shed feces in the Katsurahama aquarium, ‘the team wrote in their paper.

The researchers also calculated that the pressure in the digestive tract of a Humboldt penguin should be about 28 kilopascals.

This pressure in a human – presumably with a very aggressive abdominal pain – would cause them to expel feces up to about 10 feet (or 3 meters) away.

Any person capable of such an impressive performance, the researchers conclude, should not use conventional toilets.

“Although we assume an ideal situation to obtain the numerical value, this way one can easily understand the incredible power of the penguin’s rectum,” she added.

The water bird's high 'rectal pressure' - which sees feces at a speed of about 4.5 mph when expelled from a typical 6.6-foot-high sleep - allows penguins to ensure that both they and their nests stay dirty when they poop

The water bird's high 'rectal pressure' - which sees feces at a speed of about 4.5 mph when expelled from a typical 6.6-foot-high sleep - allows penguins to ensure that both they and their nests stay dirty when they poop

The water bird’s high ‘rectal pressure’ – which sees feces at a speed of about 4.5 mph when expelled from a typical 6.6-foot-high sleep – allows penguins to ensure that both they and their nests stay dirty when they poop

The study is a “pivotal” contribution that “pushes science forward,” said natural material expert Chris Holland of the University of Sheffield. The times – while he warns that the team’s pressure calculations are slightly different.

‘Surprisingly little is known about the flow properties of animal feces. As a result, they had to treat it like a Newtonian liquid, meaning their best projections may be an overestimate. ‘

“In reality, the stool is rather non-Newtonian – a ‘funny fluid’ – and much more complex,” he said.

“In the future, it would be helpful to understand the surface tension of the stool so that one could predict whether it is likely to radiate or mist upon release, and how it would splash so that workers could take action [to avoid it] corresponding.’

A preprint of the researchers’ article, which has not yet been peer-reviewed, can be read the arXiv repository.

PP-Pooping Penguins: The researchers also calculated that the pressure in the digestive tract of a Humboldt penguin should reach about 28 kilopascals. Pictured: In their paper, the researchers modeled a penguin's digestive system as a cylindrical tank with radius R and sphincter radius r, allowing them to calculate stomach pressure, P

PP-Pooping Penguins: The researchers also calculated that the pressure in the digestive tract of a Humboldt penguin should reach about 28 kilopascals. Pictured: In their paper, the researchers modeled a penguin's digestive system as a cylindrical tank with radius R and sphincter radius r, allowing them to calculate stomach pressure, P

PP-Pooping Penguins: The researchers also calculated that the pressure in the digestive tract of a Humboldt penguin should reach about 28 kilopascals. Pictured: In their paper, the researchers modeled a penguin’s digestive system as a cylindrical jet tank R and sphincter opening radius rso they can calculate the stomach pressure, P

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