Pediatricians call for sugar limits for baby food

Baby food pouches and jars contain dangerously high amounts of sugar, child health experts have warned.

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The Royal Society of Pediatrics and Child Health fear that children will have a & # 39; sweet tooth & # 39; develop if they get too much sugar at a young age.

And the body said that handy ready-made dishes, made by well-known brands such as Ella & # 39; s Kitchen, Heinz and Cow & Gate, may have fueled the problem.

The products can contain almost 10 g of sugar in a single package – more than half the daily amount of babies.

Parents should instead encourage children to eat more savory foods and discover different flavors such as bitter spinach and broccoli, the RCPCH said.

Baby food can be marketed to look healthy with photos of fruits and vegetables, but many actually contain about half the amount of sugar that a baby or toddler should eat over an entire day. Four-year-olds should be limited to 19 grams per day and toddlers even less than that

Baby food can be marketed to look healthy with photos of fruits and vegetables, but many actually contain about half the amount of sugar that a baby or toddler should eat over an entire day. Four-year-olds should be limited to 19 grams per day and toddlers even less than that

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It said the government should impose a legal limit on how much & # 39; free sugar & # 39; – those that occur naturally in fruit and honey – can be included in baby food.

The RCPCH called for action in a report that it hopes will help tackle tooth decay and childhood obesity.

Free sugars are basic sugars such as glucose and fructose and those naturally occurring in foods such as apples, bananas and honey.

Although they have a lesser reputation than the refined sugar used in carbonated drinks and chocolate, they have the same effects on the body.

A growing number of children are overweight - about 30 percent of them, with 17 percent being obese - and many of them are attributed to diets with a high sugar content

A growing number of children are overweight - about 30 percent of them, with 17 percent being obese - and many of them are attributed to diets with a high sugar content

A growing number of children are overweight – about 30 percent of them, with 17 percent being obese – and many of them are attributed to diets with a high sugar content

Eating too much can make the teeth rot, people arrive and even contribute to diabetes in an unhealthy diet.

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The Government's Scientific Advisory Committee on Nutrition (SACN) recommends that free sugars account for no more than five percent of the daily energy intake of a child. And this ratio should be even lower for toddlers under two years of age.

However, a survey of people across the UK showed that the average for one to three year olds is more than double the 11.3 percent.

HOW MANY SUGAR IS TOO MUCH?

The amount of sugar that a person should eat per day depends on how old she is.

Children from four to six years old must be limited to a maximum of 19 g per day.

Seven to 10 year olds should not have more than 24 g and children 11 years and older should have 30 g or less.

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Popular snacks contain a surprising amount of sugar and even one can of Coca-Cola (35 grams of sugar) or one stick of Mars (33 grams) contains more than the maximum amount of sugar that a child should have over an entire day.

A bowl of Frosties contains 24 g of sugar, which means that a 10-year-old who has Frosties for breakfast probably has reached his limit for the day before they even leave the house.

Children who eat too much sugar run the risk of damaging their teeth, attracting fat and becoming overweight and getting type 2 diabetes, which increases the risk of heart disease and cancer.

Source: NHS

A large part of this is believed to come from baby food in jars and bags, the RCPH warned in its report.

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Professor Mary Fewtrell, of the RCPCH, said: “Family life is now busier than ever before, so pots and pouches turn out to be popular with parents because they are so handy.

& # 39; We therefore want the government to introduce mandatory guidelines for how much free sugar they can contain.

& # 39; We also think that more should be invested in public health education to advise parents on the impact of free sugars.

& # 39; For parents who make their own baby food, we encourage them to reconcile sweeter flavors with more bitter flavors. & # 39;

Eating high-sugar foods can saturate the body with calories that it does not need and that is then stored as fat, causing people to arrive.

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A growing number of children are overweight – about 30 percent of them, with 17 percent being obese – and much of this is attributed to sugar patterns with a high sugar content.

And sugar also destroys the enamel layer teeth and leads to tooth decay, which affects 23 percent of five-year-olds in the UK.

The RCPCH also warned that the bags are used at the expense of children who become familiar with more acid-tasting vegetables.

& # 39; Part of the problem is that baby teat products often contain a high percentage of fruit or sweeter, tasty vegetables & # 39 ;, said Prof. Mary Fewtrell of the RCPH.

& # 39; And parents often use fruit or sweet-tasting vegetables as the first food at home.

& # 39; It is important to realize that babies & # 39; s have an innate preference for sweet flavors, but the most important thing is not to reinforce that preference and to expose them to different tastes and food textures.

& # 39; Babies & # 39; s are very willing to try different flavors if given the chance.

Advertisements for e-cigarettes that appeal to children should be banned, health experts say

Advertisements for e-cigarettes that appeal to children should be banned, health experts say

Advertisements for e-cigarettes that appeal to children should be banned, health experts say

E-CIG ADVERTISEMENTS CHILDREN CAN PURCHASE & # 39; MUST BE PROHIBITED & # 39;

E-cigarette advertisements that may be attractive to children should be banned, said the Royal College of Pediatrics and Child Health (RCPCH).

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It was claimed that although e-cigarettes were less harmful than traditional smoking, it should not be allowed to market them for non-medical reasons.

Social media often carry advertisements that perpetuate vaping, the body added.

Professor Russell Viner, president of the RCPCH, said: “The use of electronic cigarettes has increased dramatically in recent years as smokers take steps to reduce their exposure to harmful toxins in cigarettes.

& # 39; This is a welcome step, as smoking remains the leading cause of preventable deaths in the UK.

& # 39; E-cigarettes are not & # 39; safe & # 39; – they still contain nicotine – and this increase in use creates, in addition to glamorous marketing campaigns from manufacturers, another habit that appeals to young people. & # 39;

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Professor Viner said that children and adolescents can be influenced, and although manufacturers cannot advertise directly to them, & # 39; they can make their packaging and flavors very child-friendly and make & # 39 ;.

& # 39; It is important that they become acquainted with a variety of flavors at a young age, including more bitter-tasting foods such as broccoli and spinach. & # 39;

As part of its report, the RCPCH also claimed that there should be a ban on advertising milk for children under one year of age.

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The report is because the government is involved in various measures to improve children's health.

A sugar tax, which gave drink companies extra money to the government or reformulated its products to contain less sugar, was introduced last year.

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Officials are also considering obliging restaurants and takeaways to place calorie labeling on all their menus, to use traffic light labeling for all foods and beverages, to ban advertising of junk food ads before 9 p.m. and to increase the price of sugary products.

Matt Hancock, the health secretary, asked the UK head nurse last month to help him come up with more strategies to reduce childhood obesity.

President of the Royal College of Pediatrics and Child Health, Professor Russell Viner, said about today's report: “We have a real chance to transform the future of children's health in the UK.

& # 39; I think politicians are starting to realize that investing in children brings real benefits to the wider population.

& # 39; Our recommendations are supported by evidence and are practical.

& # 39; They will make a big difference to children's health and we urge the government to regard them as a matter of urgency.

& # 39; If we don't get it right for children, the health of the entire nation is endangered. & # 39;

MailOnline has contacted the baby food manufacturers mentioned in the story for comment.

The CEO of Ella & Kitchen, Mark Cuddigan, said: & although we do not add sugar to our bags, we are actively taking steps to reduce the natural sugar content of our products with the highest sugar content, by using fruit with to include a lower sugar content. & # 39;

Cow and Gate responded through their trade association, British Specialist Nutrition Association (BSNA). BSNA Director General, Declan O & Brien, said: & # 39; BSNA members wholeheartedly support measures to improve baby's health and have had meetings with Public Health England to lower it discuss the sugar content of products where possible.

& # 39; Baby food products are already strictly regulated and are also tailored to the specific needs of young children.

& # 39; At the same time, BSNA member companies are always working to improve their products and would like to collaborate with experts in this field. & # 39;

WHAT IS THE SUGAR TAX?

From April 2018, soft drink companies had to pay a levy for drinks with added sugar.

If a drink contains between 5 g and 8 g of sugar per 100 ml, the load is 18 p per liter, while if a drink contains more than 8 g of sugar per 100 ml, the load is 24 p.

Fruit juices and milk are not included in the tax.

The move is intended to help tackle child obesity. Sugar-sweetened soft drinks are now the largest source of nutritional sugar for children and teenagers.

Some drinks, including Fanta, Lucozade, Sprite, Dr. Pepper and Vimto, had changed their recipes so that they contained less than 5 g of sugar and did not have to make up the price.

However, others such as Coca-Cola and Pepsi refused to reduce the amount of sugar and as a result the price of it increased.

The government has predicted that the tax will raise £ 240 million a year, which will be spent on sports clubs and breakfast clubs in schools.

The sugar tax increased £ 153.8 million in the first six months after introduction, between April and October 2018.

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