Pear once ate a biscuit that was 20 years old … and insists it tasted good

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That costs the cookie! Pear once ate a sweet treat that was 20 years old … and insists it tasted good

  • Lord Palmer told his colleagues that he had once eaten a 20-year-old ‘perfectly edible’ cookie
  • He claimed the sell-by date is “far too cautious” as he voiced concerns about food waste
  • The crossbench hereditary pear later revealed that the snack was a shortbread

Lord Palmer, whose family owned the Huntley & Palmers biscuit company, told peers that he once ate a 20-year-old 'perfectly edible' biscuit.

Lord Palmer, whose family owned the Huntley & Palmers biscuit company, told peers that he once ate a 20-year-old ‘perfectly edible’ biscuit.

The House of Lords has – on occasion – been accused of exceeding the sell-by date.

But for one pear, that’s not the way the cookie crumbles.

Lord Palmer, whose family owned the Huntley & Palmers biscuit company, told peers he once ate a ‘perfectly edible’ 20-year-old specimen.

The crossbench hereditary pear claimed the sell-by date was “ far too cautious, ” raising concerns about food waste.

He added, “My dad always believed it didn’t matter how old they were when it came to non-sweet cookies, like the one with cheese.”

Richmond Secretary of the Environment Lord Goldsmith said he did not believe he had eaten such an old cookie, but “would not be afraid of it.”

Lord Palmer later revealed that the snack had been a ‘butter shortie’ shortbread cookie.

He added, “There was no such thing as sell-by dates when I was growing up.”

Huntley & Palmers was one of the first global companies and ran what was once the largest biscuit factory in the world. The company was sold to Nabisco in 1984.

In 2017, curators found a 106-year-old fruitcake made by the company among the artifacts at Cape Adare, Antarctica.

Lord Palmer later revealed that the snack had been a 'butter shortie' shortbread cookie (file photo)

Lord Palmer later revealed that the snack had been a 'butter shortie' shortbread cookie (file photo)

Lord Palmer later revealed that the snack was a ‘butter shortie’ shortbread cookie (file photo)

It is believed to have been part of the ration of Captain Robert Falcon Scott’s Terra Nova Expedition from 1910 to 1913.

Captain Scott left England for Antarctica in 1910 armed with Huntley & Palmers biscuits, some of which were made for the expedition.

In 2011, a 104-year-old Huntley and Palmers biscuit taken by Sir Ernest Shackleton on his 1907 Antarctic expedition was sold at auction for £ 1,250.

In response to Lord Palmer’s comments, Secretary of the Environment Lord Goldsmith of Richmond said he did not believe he had eaten such an old cookie, but “would not be afraid of it.”

The Tory front bench highlighted the steps being taken by the government to reduce food waste, which he said would help tackle climate change and the natural world.

Lord Palmer, who said he was’ involved in the food industry all my life ‘, said,’ I’m sure one of the biggest issues is that expiration dates on products are way too careful.

‘I remember eating a 20-year-old biscuit once. It was perfectly edible. ‘

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