Take a fresh look at your lifestyle.

Pauline Hanson is ranting about the residents of the housing committee in Melbourne incarcerated

Pauline Hanson has held a shocking rant about the residents of the Melbourne housing committee in lockdown, calling them ‘drug addicts and alcoholics’ claiming to learn to speak English.

The hard shutdown was imposed by the Victorian government on Saturday in an attempt to curb an outbreak after 27 people in Melbourne’s public housing towers were found positive for the corona virus.

More than 3,000 tenants in nine buildings were unprepared for the surprise decision, and many were left without messages.

Speaking to host Allison Langdon on Monday’s Today Show, the leader of the One Nation denied that residents have access to essential supplies.

“Ah come on Ally, we’ve seen food delivered there,” Hanson replied.

“Many of them are also drug addicts, they get their medicines, they are alcoholics, so they take care of them that way.”

She then suggested that refugees from war-torn countries should be able to deal with incarceration.

Pauline Hanson has delivered a shocking rant on the residents of the Melbourne Housing Commission when closed

Pauline Hanson has delivered a shocking rant on the residents of the Melbourne Housing Commission when closed

The hard shutdown was imposed by the Victorian government on Saturday in an attempt to contain an outbreak after 27 people in Melbourne's public housing towers were found positive for the corona virus

The hard shutdown was imposed by the Victorian government on Saturday in an attempt to contain an outbreak after 27 people in Melbourne's public housing towers were found positive for the corona virus

The hard shutdown was imposed by the Victorian government on Saturday in an attempt to contain an outbreak after 27 people in Melbourne’s public housing towers were found positive for the corona virus

During each shift, about 500 police officers are deployed across the nine towers, or about 55 officers per unit (Pictured: a group of officers outside the residential towers on Racecourse Road)

During each shift, about 500 police officers are deployed across the nine towers, or about 55 officers per unit (Pictured: a group of officers outside the residential towers on Racecourse Road)

During each shift, about 500 police officers are deployed across the nine towers, or about 55 officers per unit (Pictured: a group of officers outside the residential towers on Racecourse Road)

“You know, these people, I saw them bring a truck of food to them, the rest, when they come from war-torn countries, what some of these people are, they know what it’s like to be in a difficult situation , ‘she said.

“So I would say, you know, take a look at the facts before you criticize that aspect and I think that the governments and all these others, you know, these interest groups and everyone are making sure they are well taken care of. ‘

Hanson rejected suggestions that health authorities and the government could have communicated with residents in their mother tongue.

“Why should we? Why turn off everything in someone else’s language when you come to Australia, “she said.

“We must not publish literature in their own language. Learn to speak English when you come here to this country. That’s a big problem we have in Australia. ‘

Many of these people come from a non-English speaking background, probably English is their second language that has not adhered to the rules of social distance. They all used a lot of the same wax, “she said.

Hanson went on to suggest that the 3,000 residents of social housing were locked up “not doing the right things.”

“So you have to see why they are in that situation. Why are they in that situation? Why did the government go to this high building and shut it down? Possibly because many of these people were not doing the right thing, ”she said.

“Is the government concerned about the other areas that will be closed? You know, the people in their houses, are they actually able to go outside and buy the food?

“There has to be a reason why they focused on this set of blocks, apartment blocks. Ask that question. ‘

Prime Minister Andrews closed the doors of nine residential towers on Saturday from 4 p.m., fearing the virus would spread quickly within their walls.

The ‘hard shutdown’ will force 3,000 people in towers in Flemington, Kensington and North Melbourne to stay inside – with armed police on every floor of every block to ensure they don’t leave for the next five days for any reason .

More than 3,000 tenants in nine buildings were unprepared for the surprise decision, and many were left without messages

More than 3,000 tenants in nine buildings were unprepared for the surprise decision, and many were left without messages

More than 3,000 tenants in nine buildings were unprepared for the surprise decision, and many were left without messages

Towers in the suburbs of Flemington (photo), Kensington and North Melbourne are closed for five days

Towers in the suburbs of Flemington (photo), Kensington and North Melbourne are closed for five days

Towers in the suburbs of Flemington (photo), Kensington and North Melbourne are closed for five days

Victoria has been struggling with a coronavirus outbreak at several Melbourne hotspots for weeks.

The state achieved another 74 new cases on Sunday, bringing the number of confirmed infections to 2,536.

Some 12 Victorian zip codes are locked in phase three until July 29 to prevent the spread of the virus.

Two of those areas, covering North Melbourne, Hotham Hill, Kensington and Flemington, are home to the nine all-towers.

Prime Minister Daniel Andrews said the hard shutdown was about the safety of both residents and the entire state.

“This is not about punishment, this is about protection for you and your loved ones,” he said.

“And then, by extension, it’s about protecting the entire state and we don’t make those decisions lightly.”

.