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She, along with senior owners Cassidy and Reggie Uluru, gave Senator Hanson their blessing to climb the rock, offering a thumbs up to A Current Affair cameras before they took off

Senator Pauline Hanson was involved in a fiery exchange with a trio of young indigenous women who tried to educate her about the moral problems of climbing Uluru – but also found unlikely support.

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The leader of the One Nation, who publicly criticized the climbing ban, told the girls that she was only interested in talking to the traditional owners of the country about the impending closure of the holy place.

She then prosecuted the girls – who are native Australians but were not born in the Northern Territory – for stealing & # 39; of the jobs of the local population.

She, along with senior owners Cassidy and Reggie Uluru, gave Senator Hanson their blessing to climb the rock, offering a thumbs up to A Current Affair cameras before they took off

She, along with senior owners Cassidy and Reggie Uluru, gave Senator Hanson their blessing to climb the rock, offering a thumbs up to A Current Affair cameras before they took off

Senator Hanson visited Uluru after she was formally invited by Jimpanna Yulara, a senior member of the Anangu Mayatja Council of Elders.

Mrs. Yulara, who & # 39; happy & # 39; Senator Hanson made the trip and expressed her concern about the impact that closing the site can have on jobs for locals in the area.

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& # 39; Now we don't employ Anangu people in our own backyard, & # 39; she said.

She, along with senior owners Cassidy and Reggie Uluru, gave Senator Hanson their blessing to climb the rock and offered a thumbs up to A Current Affair cameras before she ascended.

But the politician did not rise very far until she decided to return.

& # 39; I can't walk down here. My boots are so damn old. They are so smooth that I can't get a grip. I'll tell you something, I can't get a grip on my backside either, & she said.

Senator Hanson visited Uluru after she was formally invited by Jimpanna Yulara, a senior member of the Anangu Mayatja Council of Elders

Senator Hanson visited Uluru after she was formally invited by Jimpanna Yulara, a senior member of the Anangu Mayatja Council of Elders

Senator Hanson visited Uluru after she was formally invited by Jimpanna Yulara, a senior member of the Anangu Mayatja Council of Elders

Senator Pauline Hanson went toe-to-toe with a trio of young indigenous women who tried to teach her about the moral problems with climbing Uluru

Senator Pauline Hanson went toe-to-toe with a trio of young indigenous women who tried to teach her about the moral problems with climbing Uluru

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Senator Pauline Hanson went toe-to-toe with a trio of young indigenous women who tried to teach her about the moral problems with climbing Uluru

Senator Hanson said she had received overwhelming support from local traditional owners in her attempt to lift the climbing ban.

& # 39; Many people have a lot of respect for me and appreciate the work I do for them, & # 39; she said.

She told three girls who worked in the region that her loyalty lies with the locals who felt they were being overlooked because of the employment opportunities for indigenous people from other communities.

The girls claimed that although they were not born in the Northern Territory, they got along well with their native colleagues.

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& # 39; What, so our opinion does not matter? & # 39; a girl responded. & # 39; Uluru is still sacred to us. & # 39;

Senator Hanson further said that, following the girl's logic, she should also be considered as native.

The leader of the One Nation (photo) is a vocal critic of the movement to prevent people from climbing the famous rock and on Thursday tried to challenge it upscaling

The leader of the One Nation (photo) is a vocal critic of the movement to prevent people from climbing the famous rock and on Thursday tried to challenge it upscaling

The leader of the One Nation (photo) is a vocal critic of the movement to prevent people from climbing the famous rock and on Thursday tried to challenge it upscaling

& # 39; I could claim to be native with you, & # 39; she said.

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& # 39; I was born here. I am native to the country, so I am also Australian and I am native.

& # 39; Do you know the word native? It means native to the country. Where is my country if it is not Australia? & # 39;

& # 39; Eh, England, & # 39; the girl replied.

Mrs. Hanson had entered the Northern Territory earlier this week and announced her intention to climb the rock in violation of the ban.

She has previously broadcast her disagreement and even closed the iconic rock compared to closing Bondi Beach in eastern Sydney.

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Uluru will be closed to climbers in October after a decision was made to prevent future scaling up of the holy place

She said the sacred rock must remain open to climb because & # 39; we have been climbing the Ayers Rock of Uluru for many years & # 39 ;.

& # 39; People have been climbing the rock all these years and now they suddenly want to close it? & # 39 ;, Hanson said to Deb Knight on Channel Nine & # 39; s Today.

Senator Hanson said the closing of the climb in October is ridiculous & # 39; and pointed out that it provided significant income for the local indigenous community.

& # 39; Australian taxpayers are putting in millions, hundreds of millions of dollars, and they want another $ 27.5 million to upgrade the airport there for the resort, & # 39; she said.

& # 39; Now the resort has only recently returned $ 19 million to taxpayers. More than 400 people work there, 38 percent are Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders.

& # 39; It's making money. It gives jobs to indigenous communities and you have thousands of tourists who go there every year and want to climb the rock. & # 39;

The leader of the One Nation was an outspoken critic of the upcoming prohibition and even tried to challenge the holy place in the Northern Territory even on Thursday.

The leader of the One Nation was an outspoken critic of the upcoming prohibition and even tried to challenge the holy place in the Northern Territory even on Thursday.

The leader of the One Nation was an outspoken critic of the upcoming prohibition and even tried to challenge the holy place in the Northern Territory even on Thursday.

WHY DO ABORIGINAL PARENTS ASK FOR A PROHIBITION ON ULIMU CLIMBING?

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In November 2017, it was announced that climbing Uluru, considered a holy place by the local Anangu people, would be prohibited from October 26, 2019.

The management of Uluru-Kata Tjuta National Park, consisting of a majority of traditional Aboriginal owners, decided unanimously to close the climb.

Traditional owner and chairman Sammy Wilson said on behalf of the Anangu people that it was time to do this.

& # 39; We've talked about it for so long and now we can finish the climb, & # 39; said Wilson. & # 39; It is about protection by combining two systems, the government and Anangu.

& # 39; This decision is for both Anangu and non-Anangu together to be proud of; to realize, of course it is correct to close it.

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& # 39; The country has law and culture. We welcome tourists here. Closing the climb is not something to worry about, but a reason to celebrate. Let's come together, let's close it together.

& # 39; If I travel to another country and there is a holy place, an area with limited access, I do not enter or climb it, I respect it. It is the same here for Anangu. We welcome tourists here. We do not stop tourism, only this activity. & # 39;

Uluru and Kata Tjuta – formerly known as the Olgas – were returned to the Anangu people on October 26, 1985.

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