Pauline Hanson celebrates 20 years since her controversial Longreach speech

Pauline Hanson (pictured) said that

The leader of One Nation, Pauline Hanson, insists that she does not regret her infamous speech, that she described the political controversies of her party on indigenous issues and that "the question of aboriginality would no longer exist."

Tuesday marks 20 years since he went to the Longreach community in west central Queensland, which is located in the traditional lands of the Iningai, Malintji and Kuunkari peoples.

Australia commemorated National Sorry Day for the first time a few months before her speech.

Ms. Hanson stated that she has been dishonestly referred to as racist and that her schedule was to "shake the cage and shake the elite ship."

Pauline Hanson (pictured) said that "the issue of aboriginality would no longer exist" when she revealed the policies of her One Nation party during the 1998 federal election campaign

She revealed One Nation's plans to abolish Native Title, ATSIC and Abstudy and revealed her patriotic desire that Australians truly be a single people under one banner living and working together as a nation. & # 39;

"My simple points about what some believe are complex issues were just the common sense one could hear from any ordinary Australian citizen and no amount of slander, insult or physical threat will prevent me from giving those ordinary Australians the right to an opinion and a right for that opinion to be heard, "he told the crowd.

The federal elections were held three weeks later, when Mrs. Hanson could not be re-elected in Parliament.

The leader of One Nation made several fruitless comebacks to politics before he finally returned to the federal parliament as federal Senator in 2016.

"I totally agree with the sentiment and policy objectives of my Longreach speech and I will happily give a similar speech tomorrow," Senator Hanson told NITV.

Twenty years later, Pauline Hanson (in the photo) does not regret the controversial speech

Twenty years later, Pauline Hanson (in the photo) does not regret the controversial speech

Twenty years later, Pauline Hanson (in the photo) does not regret the controversial speech

In her Longreach speech in 1998, Ms. Hanson said that the aborigines had no right to claim more attachment to a place because their ancestors were there first.

"You can not claim a greater sense of belonging because your relative was here before someone else's relative," he said.

"You can not say that you are more Australian than those who have lived here all the time you have."

He asked that Abstudy and organizations such as ATSIC be absorbed by existing agencies where all benefits are based "solely on individual need".

Ms. Hanson said that the aborigines (in the photo) had no right to claim more attachment to a place just because their ancestors were there first.

Ms. Hanson said that the aborigines (in the photo) had no right to claim more attachment to a place just because their ancestors were there first.

Ms. Hanson said that the aborigines (in the photo) had no right to claim more attachment to a place just because their ancestors were there first.

Ms. Hanson also described Native Title as a "shameless appropriation of the land" and that the subject of the aborigine "would no longer exist as the benefits under the race would no longer exist" according to the One Nation policy.

"We should sit as a nation and talk about these issues not as Aboriginals or as Aborigines, but as Australians," said Ms. Hanson.

"We should speak without hatred, without greed or guilt, and not from the past, but with the understanding of our need to be one people and the future we must forge together.

"As far as aboriginality is concerned, I should add spirituality to pride, but we should not accept the proposition of financial gain through racial discrimination."

Three weeks after her Longreach speech in 1998, Pauline Hanson lost her seat in the federal parliament

Three weeks after her Longreach speech in 1998, Pauline Hanson lost her seat in the federal parliament

Three weeks after her Longreach speech in 1998, Pauline Hanson lost her seat in the federal parliament

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