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Pauline Hanson calls for medical cannabis to be affordable for families

Queensland senator Pauline Hanson has called for medical cannabis to be affordable for families who spend thousands of dollars a month on medicines.

Ms. Hanson shared a clip on Friday from A Current Affair, which uses it as an example of Australians struggling to afford medical cannabis to treat their conditions.

In the video, parents Chad and Tamara Edwards give their young daughter Carlie CBD oil to treat her seizures caused by Druvet syndrome.

The syndrome is a rare, drug-resistant epilepsy that begins in an otherwise healthy baby in the first year of life.

The parents spend $ 1,100 on CBD oil monthly.

Mr. and Mrs. Edwards, who run a family business and have three daughters, are under enormous financial pressure as the cost of the oil will increase as Carlie will need higher doses as she ages.

Ms Hanson said that the family situation is a shining example of why “medical cannabis should be more available and affordable”.

Queensland Senator Pauline Hanson (photo) shared a clip of A Current Affair on Friday, using it as an example of Australians struggling to pay for medical cannabis to treat their conditions

Queensland Senator Pauline Hanson (photo) shared a clip of A Current Affair on Friday, using it as an example of Australians struggling to pay for medical cannabis to treat their conditions

“When it comes to ensuring that everyday Aussies have access to and can afford medical cannabis, we’ve come a long way, but there’s still a lot of work to be done,” Hanson wrote on Facebook.

As this segment of A Current Affair shows, too many Australians still find medical cannabis unnecessarily expensive and difficult to access.

Australians should not suffer and die because their government does not grant negligent citizens the right to medicine.

“That’s why I will continue to fight to make this drug available to anyone who needs it.”

In Australia, medical cannabis is 20 to 40 percent higher than in other countries with medical programs such as Canada.

Epilepsy patients spend an average of $ 992 per month on treatment, while those with chronic pain spend $ 353 per month, according to Cannabis Access Clinics.

Medical products are also 25 percent higher than illegal products.

However, the growing number of local Australian suppliers is expected to lower the prices of medicinal cannabis in the future.

In the video, toddler Carlie Edwards (photo) had intense seizures caused by Druvet syndrome, a rare, drug-resistant epilepsy that begins in the first year of an otherwise healthy baby

In the video, toddler Carlie Edwards (photo) had intense seizures caused by Druvet syndrome, a rare, drug-resistant epilepsy that begins in the first year of an otherwise healthy baby

In the video, toddler Carlie Edwards (photo) had intense seizures caused by Druvet syndrome, a rare, drug-resistant epilepsy that begins in the first year of an otherwise healthy baby

Carlie's parents Chad and Tamara Edwards gave their daughter cannabidiol (CBD) oil to their daughter to treat her epilepsy. CBD is used to treat many medical conditions, while the other constituent of cannabis, tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), has psychoactive effects

Carlie's parents Chad and Tamara Edwards gave their daughter cannabidiol (CBD) oil to their daughter to treat her epilepsy. CBD is used to treat many medical conditions, while the other constituent of cannabis, tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), has psychoactive effects

Carlie’s parents Chad and Tamara Edwards gave their daughter cannabidiol (CBD) oil to their daughter to treat her epilepsy. CBD is used to treat many medical conditions, while the other constituent of cannabis, tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), has psychoactive effects

Cannabis consists of two main components, cannabidiol (CBD) and tetrahydrocannabinol (THC).

CBD in oil form is often used to treat epilepsy and muscle pain, while THC is the psychoactive part of cannabis that is often used recreationally.

Earlier this month, Hanson took advantage of the coalition to go through Senate legislation that will make it easier to export medical cannabis and hemp products.

The coalition needed Ms. Hanson to vote against extending JobKeeper to universities, foreign-owned companies with local workers, and restoring the one-week consultation period for cut wages.

On 13 May, Secretary of Agriculture David Littleproud submitted the bill to amend the 2020 export legislation, with the aim of piloting it through the Senate.

The bill allows the export of certain narcotic goods, such as medicinal cannabis and low THC hemp products.

While Labor’s leader of opposition company Tony Burke and agricultural spokesman Joel Fitzgibbon were suspicious of the coalition’s motives, they said the party would support the bill.

The bill is yet to reach the Senate floor, but is expected to be passed.

Mrs. Hanson is eating a pizza. The Senator believes that medical cannabis should be more widely available and affordable for “everyday Australians.”

Ms. Hanson’s One Nation party has been supporting medical cannabis since 2015.

“One Nation believes that a trial of cannabis is considered a reasonable option for those who suffer because other treatments are not effective enough in some cases,” says One Nation’s website.

Because of Australia’s draconian laws on the use of medical cannabis, many go abroad to access the drug. Australians who use it face criminal charges and prison terms.

“Australian politicians should not stand in the way of Australians fighting to save their loved ones.”

At the federal level, medical cannabis has been legal since 2016, while recreational use is not.

To use medicinal cannabis, a patient must obtain permission from the Therapeutic Goods Administration.

After approval, people can purchase medicinal cannabis products from recognized manufacturers.

The ACT is the only state in Australia to legalize the recreational use of cannabis after it passed a bill in September last year.

In Canberra, people can own up to 50 grams of dried cannabis, 150 grams of fresh cannabis, grow two cannabis plants per person and use cannabis at home.

In Canberra, people can own up to 50 grams of dried cannabis, 150 grams of fresh cannabis, grow two cannabis plants per person and use cannabis at home

In Canberra, people can own up to 50 grams of dried cannabis, 150 grams of fresh cannabis, grow two cannabis plants per person and use cannabis at home

In Canberra, people can own up to 50 grams of dried cannabis, 150 grams of fresh cannabis, grow two cannabis plants per person and use cannabis at home

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