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Paul Gary Turner, 43, (center) is accused of stabbing Sarah Marie Thomas five times, including three in her neck, at the Joondalup Justice Complex in December 2016.

Man who learned techniques for killing command & # 39; s before alleged mediation assassination asserted in tears that he & # 39; can't remember & # 39; what happened

  • Paul Gary Turner allegedly stabbed his ex-wife Sarah Marie Thomas
  • He is accused of smuggling a knife in a mediation session in a courthouse
  • Court heard that one of the stitches cut the carotid artery of the woman and killed her
  • Turner told the court that for years he & # 39; command & espionage techniques & # 39; had learned
  • Turner cried while claiming he cannot remember what happened during the incident
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A man accused of murdering his former partner by stabbing her repeatedly at a court complex in Perth has cried and claims that he cannot remember what happened, suggesting he had an attack.

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Paul Gary Turner, 43, allegedly smuggled a kitchen knife to a pre-trial conference with Sarah Marie Thomas at Joondalup Justice Complex in December 2016 and stabbed her five times, including three times, and held out a finger.

One of the stitches cut the carotid artery of the 33-year-old, who killed her in seconds.

Paul Gary Turner (center), 43, allegedly smuggled a kitchen knife in a pre-trial conference with Sarah Marie Thomas at the Joondalup Justice Complex in December 2016

Paul Gary Turner (center), 43, allegedly smuggled a kitchen knife in a pre-trial conference with Sarah Marie Thomas at the Joondalup Justice Complex in December 2016

Turner told the WA Supreme Court on Wednesday that after he had an accident while working as a truck driver in 2015, he had symptoms, including constant intense headache and attacks that caused blackouts.

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He claimed he had no memory of what happened when he went blackout.

The couple became embroiled in a custody dispute in the days prior to the attack and met a clerk at the Joondalup complex about Thomas's separate claim that Thomas owed him money.

One of the stitches cut Mrs. Thomas's carotid artery, who killed her in seconds

One of the stitches cut Mrs. Thomas's carotid artery, who killed her in seconds

One of the stitches cut Mrs. Thomas's carotid artery, who killed her in seconds

The couple met a registrar in the Joondalup complex about Turner's claim that Mrs. Thomas (photo) owed him money

The couple met a registrar in the Joondalup complex about Turner's claim that Mrs. Thomas (photo) owed him money

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The couple became embroiled in a custody dispute in the days prior to the attack and met a clerk at the Joondalup complex about Turner's separate claim that Mrs. Thomas (photo) owed him money

Lawyer Lisa Boston asked what happened next.

& # 39; I don't remember anymore, & # 39; Turner replied.

He said the next thing he remembered was at a police station.

& # 39; I remember looking at my hands and they are covered with blood, & # 39; Turner said, crying.

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After the lawyer asked how the family court cases had touched him, he replied: & # 39; It was pretty difficult & # 39 ;.

& # 39; I love my children.

& # 39; The whole situation was stressful and it didn't have to be that way. & # 39;

The jury was shown a letter that Mrs. Thomas wrote to a doctor about Turner's symptoms, in which she said she believed he had sustained head injury and was gone for 40 seconds at a time with the fairies & # 39 ;.

Turner said his attacks usually lasted 10-20 seconds, but sometimes more than 45 minutes.

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He claimed that he was once in the stores in different clothes than he was wearing, holding purchased items and could not remember how he got there.

In Mrs. Thomas's letter, she said her eight-year-old partner could be short-sighted, especially with the children.

Turner admitted earlier that in the mid-2000s he had trained about three days a week to three days a week in deadly command weapon techniques and learned how to kill quickly by cutting through various arteries, including the carotid artery.

To fatally break down that artery with one stroke, & # 39; you would stick the knife behind the muscle and tear forward & # 39 ;, he said.

Turner & # 39; s testimony continues.

Turner admitted earlier in the mid-2000s that he had trained three days a week in deadly command weapon techniques for three days a week and learned how to kill quickly by cutting various arteries, including the carotid artery (pictured is the knife that reportedly used by Turner)
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Turner admitted earlier in the mid-2000s that he had trained three days a week in deadly command weapon techniques for three days a week and learned how to kill quickly by cutting various arteries, including the carotid artery (pictured is the knife that reportedly used by Turner)

Turner admitted earlier in the mid-2000s that he had trained three days a week in deadly command weapon techniques for three days a week and learned how to kill quickly by cutting various arteries, including the carotid artery (pictured is the knife that reportedly used by Turner)

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