Passport used by Salisbury Novichok suspects links him directly to the Russian secret services

Lies: the suspects Ruslan Boshirov, left, and Alexander Petrov - secret documents reveal the Novichok duo's link to the Russian army

A passport used by one of the Kremlin assassins who tried to poison Sergei Skripal in Salisbury links him directly to the Russian security services.

Travel documents used by a Russian agent who uses Alexander Petrov's identity are marked as "top secret". and include a telephone number for the Russian Ministry of Defense.

The finding of the respected research website Bellingcat directly contradicts claims by Russian President Vladimir Putin that Petrov and his accomplice Ruslan Boshirov were simply civilians who traveled to Salisbury to see its cathedral and nearby Stonehenge.

When the number was touched by reporters yesterday, an employee of the office refused to give information about Petrov's passports or comment on his apparent links with the Russian government.

Lies: the suspects Ruslan Boshirov, left, and Alexander Petrov - secret documents reveal the Novichok duo's link to the Russian army

Lies: the suspects Ruslan Boshirov, left, and Alexander Petrov – secret documents reveal the Novichok duo's link to the Russian army

A screenshot taken on September 13, 2018, from images transmitted by the Russian state radio station Russia Today (RT), shows two men, allegedly Alexander Petrov and Ruslan Boshirov, taking part in a television interview.

A screenshot taken on September 13, 2018, from images transmitted by the Russian state radio station Russia Today (RT), shows two men, allegedly Alexander Petrov and Ruslan Boshirov, taking part in a television interview.

A screenshot taken on September 13, 2018, from images transmitted by the Russian state radio station Russia Today (RT), shows two men, allegedly Alexander Petrov and Ruslan Boshirov, taking part in a television interview.

It has also been discovered that the Petrov and Boshirov passports, which were issued in 2009, provide almost no biographical information about either of the two men before that year, like any residential address.

There are also no records of Petrov or Boshirov having a passport before 2009.

This has convinced security experts that Petrov and Boshirov were simply cover identities created by Russia's GRU military intelligence service for use in operations abroad.

Scotland Yard also says that these are the aliases of the assassins who traveled to Britain on March 2 of this year for their assassination mission.

Security sources have informed The Mail on Sunday that Scotland Yard and MI6 are sitting in a large amount of additional evidence linking Petrov and Boshirov with the attempt to kill Sergei Skripal using nerve agent Novichok.

They say that this evidence will only occur if the two Russian agents are brought to trial.

Petrov and Boshirov have been accused of conspiring to assassinate Sergei, Yulia Skripal and Detective Sergeant Nick Bailey.

Former Russian spy Sergei Skripal and his daughter were found collapsed on March 4; the police officer got sick after trying to help them.

Russian investigative reporter Sergei Kanev, who worked with Bellingcat, said that "normal people" did not get their passports from the Russian Ministry of Defense, "only people who often work undercover, including intelligence services."

A passport used by one of the Kremlin assassins who tried to poison Sergei Skripal in Salisbury links him directly to the Russian security services.

A passport used by one of the Kremlin assassins who tried to poison Sergei Skripal in Salisbury links him directly to the Russian security services.

A passport used by one of the Kremlin assassins who tried to poison Sergei Skripal in Salisbury links him directly to the Russian security services.

Last night, a spokeswoman for the Russian government rejected the claims and suggested that the website should have links to Western intelligence agencies because their information on Petrov and Boshirov's passports came from a database that was not publicly available.

In an interview with the Russia Today television network, sponsored by the Kremlin, last week, Petrov and Boshirov claimed that these were their real names and that they had planned their two-day excursion to Salisbury well in advance.

But now it has been discovered that the couple actually booked their tickets on the Russian airline Aeroflot on March 1, the night before their short trip to London and Salisbury.

The Mail on Sunday also understands that they used cash instead of credit or debit cards while in the UK, even when they paid train tickets back from London to Salisbury on March 2 and March 3.

Prime Minister Theresa May has described the cover stories of Petrov and Boshirov as "lies and flagrant fabrication."

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