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Parrot admires his reflection in the Australian traffic camera

On a wing and a look: Parrot admires its reflection in the Australian traffic camera

  • The parrot obstructed a security camera by viewing its own reflection
  • The Corella bird began to peck at the camera lens on a portal above the road
  • Nicknamed Ralph, the bird entertained camera managers in Perth, Australia

A cheeky parrot brought hilarity to an Australian highway by viewing its reflection in a security camera.

The curious corella bird started pecking at the camera lens on a portal above the highway in Western Australia last week.

It caught the spotlight from passing cars and potential traffic offenders as it tried to peek into the camera lens, before several other corellas joined their friend and flew away.

The bird, a species of cockatoo, has been nicknamed ‘Ralph’ after astonishing traffic camera operators on the Kwinana Freeway in Perth.

Life on the road: this curious parrot blocked a traffic camera on an Australian highway after landing on a portal

Life on the road: this curious parrot blocked a traffic camera on an Australian highway after landing on a portal

Approach: The traffic camera had perfect vision as the cockatoo spread its wings and landed on the portal above the Kwinana Freeway

Approach: The traffic camera had perfect vision as the cockatoo spread its wings and landed on the portal above the Kwinana Freeway

Approach: The traffic camera had perfect vision as the cockatoo spread its wings and landed on the portal above the Kwinana Freeway

Three types of corella – the small corella, the long-beaked corella, and the western corella – are native to Australia.

They all have short crests, patches of bluish-gray skin around the eye, brown eyes, and buff under the wings and tail, according to the Western Australian Museum.

Small corellas have been known to enjoy themselves by sliding off rooftops, dropping off the edge, and then flying back to the top again.

Australia also has a population of yellow-crested sulfur-crested cockatoos with a longer wingspan, which are also found in New Guinea and nearby islands.

There are thought to be around 800 bird species in Australia, nearly half of which are endemic due to the continent’s long isolation from the rest of the world.

Staring straight ahead: The parrot watched its reflection in the camera lens as cars passed far below

Staring straight ahead: The parrot watched its reflection in the camera lens as cars passed far below

Staring straight ahead: The parrot watched its reflection in the camera lens as cars passed far below

A closer look: the curious corella bird leaned forward to get a better view and tried to peck at the surveillance camera lens

A closer look: the curious corella bird leaned forward to get a better view and tried to peck at the surveillance camera lens

A closer look: the curious corella bird leaned forward to get a better view and tried to peck at the surveillance camera lens

Eye to eye: the bird obstructed the view of cars and potential traffic offenders as it stared curiously at the camera

Eye to eye: the bird obstructed the view of cars and potential traffic offenders as it stared curiously at the camera

Eye to eye: the bird obstructed the view of cars and potential traffic offenders as it stared curiously at the camera

Entertainment: The bird, a type of cockatoo, has been nicknamed 'Ralph' after surprising traffic camera operators on the Kwinana Freeway

Entertainment: The bird, a type of cockatoo, has been nicknamed 'Ralph' after surprising traffic camera operators on the Kwinana Freeway

Entertainment: The bird, a type of cockatoo, has been nicknamed ‘Ralph’ after surprising traffic camera operators on the Kwinana Freeway

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