Parler ‘referred violent content to FBI more than 50 TIMES leading up to January 6 riot’

0

Parler has said that the violent content from his platform referred to the FBI more than 50 times in the weeks leading up to the MAGA riot on Jan. 6 at the Capitol.

The social media platform, a firm favorite among right-wing Americans, told the House Oversight and Reform Committee in a letter on Thursday that it had turned over multiple messages to U.S. authorities where users had made specific threats against the Capitol on the day Congress gathered to declare Joe Biden’s election win.

Parler’s partnership with the agency began in November, it alleged, nearly two months before the deadly siege that killed five, including a Capitol agent, and fled lawmakers for their lives.

The letter, sent to New York Representative and House Oversight Committee chairman Carolyn Maloney, comes as the platform is under investigation by the House Oversight and Reform Committee for his part in the riot.

Several rioters used the platform to stage the deadly attack, and in the days that followed, the app was thrown offline when Apple, Amazon and Google dropped it from their services.

Since then, Parler has come back online and ousted its CEO John Matze, who is now suing the platform.

However, the reports of cooperation with the FBI raise new questions as to whether the authorities had previous information about the attack and could have done more to prevent the January 6 events.

Parler has said that the violent content from his platform referred to the FBI more than 50 times in the weeks leading up to the MAGA riot on Jan. 6 at the Capitol. Rioters break through a police barrier that day

The platform told the House Oversight and Reform Committee in a letter on Thursday that it had turned over multiple posts to US authorities where users had made specific threats against the Capitol on the day Congress gathered to certify Joe Biden's election victory.

The platform told the House Oversight and Reform Committee in a letter on Thursday that it had turned over multiple posts to US authorities where users had made specific threats against the Capitol on the day Congress gathered to certify Joe Biden's election victory.

The platform told the House Oversight and Reform Committee in a letter on Thursday that it had turned over multiple posts to US authorities where users had made specific threats against the Capitol on the day Congress gathered to certify Joe Biden’s election victory.

Parler said Thursday that it began working with the FBI in November “to facilitate proactive cooperation and referrals of violent threats and incitement to law enforcement.”

“In the days and weeks leading up to Jan. 6, Parler referred more than 50 times violent content from his platform to the FBI for investigation,” the company said in its letter.

“Parler has even warned law enforcement of specific threats of violence planned in the Capitol.”

In the weeks between November and the deadly uprising, the company said it had notified the agency of dozens of reports of violent threats and illegal activity on its platform, including several specifically related to the Capitol on Jan. 6.

A message written on December 24 contained a specific call to “ the congregation of an armed force of 150,000 ” people to “ respond to the January 6 congressional events, ” the Wall Street Journal

The user spoke of ‘some guys planning to scam Antifa’ on January 6 and vowed to ‘start eliminating people’.

That month, Parler said it also handed over three screenshots of a user who threatened to murder then Attorney General Bill Barr and other lawmakers.

On January 2, four days before the riot, Parler said it had handed over a string of messages from another user describing the pro-Trump rally that day as “ a final stand ‘where people would “ take back the US by force’ ‘and were ‘ready to die’ for their cause.

“It is no longer a protest,” the person wrote, according to Parler.

“This is one last booth where we draw the red line on Capitol Hill. I trust the American people will forcibly take back the US and many are ready to die to take back #USA. ‘

Parler's partnership with the agency began in November, it alleged, nearly two months before the deadly siege that killed five, including a Capitol agent, and fled lawmakers for their lives.

Parler's partnership with the agency began in November, it alleged, nearly two months before the deadly siege that killed five, including a Capitol agent, and fled lawmakers for their lives.

Parler’s partnership with the agency began in November, it alleged, nearly two months before the deadly siege that killed five, including a Capitol agent, and fled lawmakers for their lives.

The person also said he planned to wear body armor that day and made a specific threat to “ take ” the Capitol.

This isn’t a party until they announce # Trump2020 a winner. Don’t be surprised if we take the #capital letter [sic] building, ‘they wrote.

Another example of violent content Parler shared with the FBI was a post by a person bragging that people went to the Capitol on January 6 armed and were willing to “ cause chaos ” if lawmakers did “ the wrong thing. ”

“ They may be hidden at first, but if Congress is doing the wrong thing, expect real chaos because Trump needs us to cause chaos to carry out the #insurrection act, ” the person wrote in the post.

Parler said it continued to “ dutifully and proactively ” report violent content to the FBI following the Capitol riot.

Parler was thrown offline after the riot when Apple, Amazon and Google dropped it from their services.  It has since come back online and kicked off its CEO John Matze (pictured), who is now suing the platform

Parler was thrown offline after the riot when Apple, Amazon and Google dropped it from their services.  It has since come back online and kicked off its CEO John Matze (pictured), who is now suing the platform

Parler was thrown offline after the riot when Apple, Amazon and Google dropped it from their services. It has since come back online and kicked off its CEO John Matze (pictured), who is now suing the platform

The app grew in popularity among the far right in the wake of the presidential election, as Twitter and Facebook quelled the spread of disinformation and hate speech, while Donald Trump made false claims that he had won the race at the White House.

After Trump was banned from mainstream apps for spreading false claims, millions of users flocked to Parler.

But Parler went offline in January for being removed from Apple and Google app stores and pulled from a web hosting platform by Amazon, after the companies accused the platform of not tackling extremist content and calling for violence leading up to the riot of January 6.

In late January, a judge ruled against Parler’s request to force Amazon to restore the company to its web hosting services.

A month later, Parler relaunched its services online through host SkySilk, saying the new platform was built on “ sustainable, independent technology. ”

New community guidelines on Parler state that the platform is ‘position neutral’ and does not allow the promotion of crime or illegal acts.

Since the attacks, numerous Parler users have been charged in connection with the Capitol riots, and in some cases, the Justice Department has referred to the app’s suspects in charging documents.

The letter about the right-wing platform’s collaboration with US authorities in the run-up to the attack came on the same day that the bosses of Facebook, Twitter and Google were dragged before another House panel.