Park ranger shares heartbreaking photo of mother bear standing over her dead cub in Yosemite

A ranger in Yosemite National Park has posted a heartbreaking photo of a dead bear cub he discovered by the side of the road in an attempt to persuade motorists to slow down in the park.

It comes as the National Park Service struggles to manage an explosion in visiting parks from Utah to Maine since pandemic restrictions were eased.

In May, Yellowstone reported its busiest May on record, with social media photos showing miles of lines of cars and RVs at entrance gates.

At least eight bears have been hit by cars along Yosemite’s roads this year, according to the National Parks Department.

The now viral post was written Friday and uploaded by an anonymous park ranger to Yosemite’s Facebook page.

“We get this call a lot,” the message reads. ‘Too much, to be honest. “Bear hit by vehicle, dead by the side of the road.” Unfortunately it has become routine.’

A ranger in Yosemite National Park has posted a heartbreaking photo of a dead bear cub he discovered by the side of the road

According to Keep Bears Wild, vehicular-bear collisions are now one of the leading causes of black bear deaths in Yosemite

According to Keep Bears Wild, vehicular-bear collisions are now one of the leading causes of black bear deaths in Yosemite

Vehicle-bear collisions are now one of the leading causes of black bear deaths in Yosemite, according to Keep bears wild.

Since 1995, more than 400 vehicle-bear collisions have occurred along roads in Yosemite National Park.

Although the collision happened sometime around noon, the ranger said he didn’t receive the call until 4pm.

It would be another hour before the ranger arrived at the scene and saw the small body of the cub lying on the road, “crammed and lifeless under a small pine tree.”

After the cub moved to a remote area nearby, the ranger began collecting samples and measurements for research, states the post.

The ranger mentions that the cub was female, somewhere between 6 months old and weighed just 25 pounds.

Since 1995, more than 400 vehicle-bear collisions have occurred along roads in Yosemite National Park.

Since 1995, more than 400 vehicle-bear collisions have occurred along roads in Yosemite National Park.

The National Park Service struggles to manage an explosion in visiting parks from Utah to Maine since the pandemic

The National Park Service struggles to manage an explosion in visiting parks from Utah to Maine since the pandemic

In May, Yellowstone reported its busiest May on record, with social media photos showing miles of lines of cars and RVs at entrance gates.

In May, Yellowstone reported its busiest May on record, with social media photos showing miles of lines of cars and RVs at entrance gates.

Plus, parks like Arches and nearby Canyonlands are seeing a spike in first-time visitors, and many can't fathom the parks' environmental conservation mission.

Plus, parks like Arches and nearby Canyonlands are seeing a spike in first-time visitors, and many can’t fathom the parks’ environmental conservation mission.

“I’m trying to remember how many times I’ve done this now and honestly I don’t know,” the message reads. “None of us sign up for that, but it’s part of it.”

The ranger continued to collect samples and immediately stopped at the sound of a breaking stick nearby. When the ranger looked up, an adult bear stares back intently.

It wasn’t long before the ranger realized that the huge bear standing a few inches away was the cub’s mother.

“Now here I am, between a grieving mother and her child. I feel like a monster. I get up, quickly grab my bag and leave. It’s time to go, even though my job isn’t done yet,” the post continued.

Before he left, the ranger set up a remote camera to capture a harrowing photo of the grieving mother bear and her cub.

While the national park reports the number of bears hit by vehicles each year, the ranger says the numbers don’t tell the full story.

“I want people to see what I’ve seen: the sad reality behind each of these numbers,” the ranger said.

Video captured as conservationists helped to remove a bucket that had sat on a bear's head for a week in Denver

Video captured as conservationists helped to remove a bucket that had sat on a bear’s head for a week in Denver

Colorado Parks and Wildlife posted a video of the rescue last week, calling it a

Colorado Parks and Wildlife posted a video of the rescue last week, calling it a “wildlife rescue success story.”

The National Park Service has seen a surge in visitors as pandemic lockdown restrictions ease.

In parks like Yosemite and Zion, visitors and staff have complained of an increase in litter, toilet paper and even human feces on trails.

Additionally, parks like Arches and nearby Canyonlands are seeing a spike in first-time visitors, with many failing to fathom the parks’ environmental conservation mission.

“Many of the first-time visitors are simply unfamiliar with national parks and our mission to conserve these resources,” said Angie Richman, chief of education, interpretation and visitor services at Arches and Canyonlands. NPR.

Last week, Colorado Parks and Wildlife posted video of the rescue to facebook on, calling it a “wildlife rescue success story.”

The bear ran around the foothills west of Boulder for a week with a chicken feed on its head, but when residents reported it, conservationists were able to track her down.

The rescue was initiated by Boulder residents Drew McConaughy and his friend Dave Sherman who spotted the bear while working on a cabin in the foothills, The Denver Canal reported.

Once they saw what turned out to be a chicken feeder that covered the animal’s entire head, they named Colorado Parks and Wildlife.

‘A bear should naturally be afraid of people. The example of how this bear ended up in that situation is breaking into someone’s chicken coop and turning that feeder upside down,” Clay said.

The nature center said: it’s critical that residents lock up anything that could attract bears to avoid another situation like this.

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