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Park ranger films a three meter long saltwater crocodile crossing an unpaved road for traffic

Hold your breath: park ranger films a three-meter saltwater crocodile crossing a dirt road for traffic

  • Huge crocodile spotted crossing a dirt road in Northern Territory on Wednesday
  • Park Ranger Jenny Hunter filmed the crocodile while driving in Kakadu National Park
  • The video was posted on Facebook with people shocked by the size of the animal

A huge three-meter-long crocodile has been filmed crossing a dirt road in the remote Kakadu National Park in the Northern Territory.

Park ranger Jenny Hunter filmed the video Wednesday with her partner Andy Ralph sending a warning to local communities in the area.

The crocodile can be seen across the dusty, red road in front of Mrs. Hunter’s four-wheel drive with something in its jaw that people commenting online suggested could be a small animal.

The huge crocodile was spotted crossing a road in the Northern Territory on Wednesday (photo)

The huge crocodile was spotted crossing a road in the Northern Territory on Wednesday (photo)

Kakadu National Park (pictured) is a UNESCO World Heritage Site and has a population of 10,000 crocodiles

Kakadu National Park (pictured) is a UNESCO World Heritage Site and has a population of 10,000 crocodiles

Kakadu National Park (pictured) is a UNESCO World Heritage Site and has a population of 10,000 crocodiles

“A decent crocodile moves over the dike and is not shy,” Mr. Ralph warned on Thursday afternoon.

Rangers in the Kakadu area recently posted warning signs about the risks posed by crocodiles after moderate flooding earlier in January.

‘Remember that just about every creek, culvert and waterhole in Kakadu contains a crocodile during the wet season – so be on the lookout and stay safe,’ he wrote.

More than 1,000 people shared the video and more than 500 people responded.

“Just another day in the territory,” one person wrote.

“That’s a decent size crocodile!” Another said.

Rangers recently posted new signs (pictured) to warn residents of crocodile dangers after flooding

Rangers recently posted new signs (pictured) to warn residents of crocodile dangers after flooding

Rangers recently posted new signs (pictured) to warn residents of crocodile dangers after flooding

The three-meter-long crocodile (pictured) was spotted in Kakadu National Park and some people said the reptile appeared to have had lunch

The three-meter-long crocodile (pictured) was spotted in Kakadu National Park and some people said the reptile appeared to have had lunch

The three-meter-long crocodile (pictured) was spotted in Kakadu National Park and some people said the reptile appeared to have had lunch

“I just went out for dinner, it looks like it could be a pig or a dog,” added a third.

Kakadu National Park is a UNESCO World Heritage Site, about 170 km southeast of Darwin.

The rugged area contains famous native rock art and an abundant Australian native wildlife, including dingoes, wallabies and quolls, along with unique birdlife.

Kakadu has a population of about 10,000 crocodiles that are either fresh water, growing up to three meters in length, or salt water, which can reach six meters in height and weigh more than a ton.

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