Parents who are violent, aggressive or abusive on social media will be banned from schools

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Parents who are violent, aggressive or abusive on social media will be banned from school for up to a year

  • Violent and aggressive parents would be banned from school under the new Victorian law
  • The legislation would allow school principals to issue safety instructions for the school community
  • Parents who use social media to threaten and abuse would also be banned from school

Violent and aggressive parents would be banned from school under a new law introduced in the Victorian Parliament.

The legislation would allow school principals to issue school community safety instructions to parents or guardians who engage in harmful, threatening or abusive behavior.

The new law would also empower schools to ban parents from using social media for threatening or abusive communication.

Schools have the right to prevent parents from entering their premises.

Violent and aggressive parents would be banned from school under new law enacted in Victorian parliament (stock image)

Violent and aggressive parents would be banned from school under new law enacted in Victorian parliament (stock image)

Exiled parents could still communicate with the school about the education of their children and agree on attendance.

Under the law, the case can be taken to court if a parent fails to comply with a security warrant.

A parent can also apply to the Victorian Civil and Administrative Court if they disagree with an internal review of an injunction.

“No one should be threatened or intimidated at work or school – that’s why we’re introducing these new laws to protect staff, students and their families,” Acting Prime Minister James Merlino said in a statement.

Andrew Dalgleish, the president of the Victorian Principals Association, said it is “sad to say” that parental threatening behavior towards schools has increased over the past 15-20 years.

He added that the new law would strengthen current powers, such as trespass orders.

“This goes a little further around a ban, a 14-day interim provision,” Mr. Dalgleish told ABC Radio.

If the behavior is more extreme or persists, it can go to a 12-month assignment.

‘Schools are by nature a safe environment, but there are times when the behavior crosses boundaries or becomes more extreme.

“It has a significant impact on the well-being of school leaders and school staff.”

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