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Amy Curreen (left) was 20 weeks pregnant when she and her husband Adam were told that if they would keep their unborn son (pictured shortly after birth) alive, his quality of life would be seriously compromised

At a time when most parents would rest and look forward to the arrival of their baby, a Brisbane couple faced the painful choice of having their unborn child die – or living with a life full of heart problems.

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Amy Curreen was 20 weeks pregnant when she and her husband Adam were told that if they kept their unborn son alive, his quality of life would be seriously compromised.

Mrs. Curreen told Daily Mail Australia that although doctors warned her that Cody would be born with a club foot, her and her husband's worlds crashed when they were told about his heart problems.

The cardiologist told Mr. and Mrs. Curreen that Cody & # 39; s heart did not look the way it should.

Amy Curreen (left) was 20 weeks pregnant when she and her husband Adam were told that if they would keep their unborn son (pictured shortly after birth) alive, his quality of life would be seriously compromised

Amy Curreen (left) was 20 weeks pregnant when she and her husband Adam were told that if they would keep their unborn son (pictured shortly after birth) alive, his quality of life would be seriously compromised

After 20 weeks of pregnancy, a cardiologist told Amy Curreen and her husband Adam that their unborn son's heart did not look like it should

After 20 weeks of pregnancy, a cardiologist told Amy Curreen and her husband Adam that their unborn son's heart did not look like it should

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After 20 weeks of pregnancy, a cardiologist told Amy Curreen and her husband Adam that their unborn son's heart did not look like it should

& # 39; At that stage, it was only lung stenosis that was sticky to the valve and was told that a simple balloon catheter would repair it if it was born to open the valve, & # 39; she said.

& # 39; But during pregnancy we had regular scans to check it and it only got worse & # 39 ;.

In the coming months, the couple regularly met the cardiologist and his nurse who discussed the possibilities for their precarious situation and how Cody's life would have.

Mr. and Mrs. Curreen were told that if they opted for surgical palliation, a single ventricular path would probably be Cody's only option, meaning that only half of his heart would work and he would need at least three surgeries.

& # 39; We received advice on how his quality of life grows up and on the risks of undergoing operations, & # 39; she said.

& # 39; If we chose to keep him alive, he would need the drug Prostin after birth to keep his pulmonary artery open, as it usually closes automatically within hours or days after birth.

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& # 39; If we chose to let him pass, they would not administer the drug and he would pass comfortably through choking with no blood in his lungs. & # 39;

Mr. and Mrs. Curreen were told that if they opted for surgical palliation, a single ventricular path might be Cody's only option, meaning that only half of his heart would work and he would need at least three surgeries

Mr. and Mrs. Curreen were told that if they opted for surgical palliation, a single ventricular path might be Cody's only option, meaning that only half of his heart would work and he would need at least three surgeries

Mr. and Mrs. Curreen were told that if they opted for surgical palliation, a single ventricular path might be Cody's only option, meaning that only half of his heart would work and he would need at least three surgeries

Cody underwent his first of many procedures when he was only a week old when doctors put a stent in his pulmonary artery to keep it open

Cody underwent his first of many procedures when he was only a week old when doctors put a stent in his pulmonary artery to keep it open

Cody underwent his first of many procedures when he was only a week old when doctors put a stent in his pulmonary artery to keep it open

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The couple's decision was only made more difficult by the fact that they would not know how big Cody & # 39; s heart defects would be until he was born.

But after seeking medical advice from professionals and other parents who had experienced similar circumstances, the Queensland couple decided to bring their baby to full term.

The couple welcomed Cody to the world on 27 February.

& # 39; We always believed Cody should be here, & # 39; said Mrs. Curreen.

He was born with lung attainment, where the lung valve does not form properly and impedes blood flow to his lungs.

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This caused the hypoplastic right heart syndrome, which meant that the right side of Cody & # 39; s heart would not become useful.

Cody spent the first 17 days of his life in the hospital, according to what Mr. and Mrs. Curreen were told, was the riskiest of the three operations he would need

Cody spent the first 17 days of his life in the hospital, according to what Mr. and Mrs. Curreen were told, was the riskiest of the three operations he would need

Cody spent the first 17 days of his life in the hospital, according to what Mr. and Mrs. Curreen were told, was the riskiest of the three operations he would need

At just three and a half months old, Cody underwent open-heart surgery

At just three and a half months old, Cody underwent open-heart surgery

At just three and a half months old, Cody underwent open-heart surgery

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Immediately after birth, Cody was taken from Mrs. Curreen to be assessed.

& # 39; We have the & # 39; normal things & # 39; missed. I had to wait to be attached before I could see him. Adam didn't even get Cody in custody until he was five days old.

Mrs. Curreen said she couldn't breast-feed Cody – who had administered a nasal tube – until he was two weeks old.

Cody underwent his first of many procedures when he was only one week old, when doctors put a stent in his pulmonary artery to keep it open.

They also tore a hole in the newborn's heart to make his rooms work.

Cody spent the first 17 days of his life in the hospital, according to what Mr. and Mrs. Curreen were told, was the riskiest of the three operations he would need.

Remarkably, Cody was only allowed to go home nine days after his surgery, but Mr. and Mrs. Curreen couldn't even get him under his arms for two months to prevent his breastbone from breaking up

Remarkably, Cody was only allowed to go home nine days after his surgery, but Mr. and Mrs. Curreen couldn't even get him under his arms for two months to prevent his breastbone from breaking up

Remarkably, Cody was only allowed to go home nine days after his surgery, but Mr. and Mrs. Curreen couldn't even get him under his arms for two months to prevent his breastbone from breaking up

Cody & # 39; s heart and liver have returned to normal size, indicating that he is most likely having an immature heart

Cody & # 39; s heart and liver have returned to normal size, indicating that he is most likely having an immature heart

Cody & # 39; s heart and liver have returned to normal size, indicating that he is most likely having an immature heart

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But Cody's fragile health suddenly took an unexpected turn.

& # 39; We thought everything went well until I took him for a heart check and was told that he had heart failure. He had myocardial crypts (that is) a spongy heart muscle, & Mrs. Curreen said.

& # 39; We were told it was a sign of an immature heart or just a dull heart where he needed a medication through IV that could only be given in the ICU. & # 39;

But babies & # 39; s younger than one cannot receive heart transplants, so after 23 days of blood pressure medication, Cody was allowed to go home.

His heart and liver have returned to normal, indicating that he is most likely an immature heart.

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At just three and a half months old, Cody underwent open-heart surgery.

Doctors plumbed his heart again to connect his lung valve directly to his lungs to bypass the right ventricle and provide immediate blood flow.

& # 39; It has affected us all as a family, because we had to balance time to make sure I could still spend time with my daughter and try to maintain our own mental health, & # 39; said Mrs. Curreen.

Due to Cody & # 39; s challenging start to life, he & # 39; is delayed & # 39; in normal milestones for children, such as raising his head and rolling over

Due to Cody & # 39; s challenging start to life, he & # 39; is delayed & # 39; in normal milestones for children, such as raising his head and rolling over

Due to Cody & # 39; s challenging start to life, he & # 39; is delayed & # 39; in normal milestones for children, such as raising his head and rolling over

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Remarkably, Cody was only allowed to go home nine days after his surgery, but Mr. and Mrs. Curreen couldn't even get him under his arms for two months to prevent his breastbone from breaking up.

& # 39; This meant he had to keep an eye on him like a hawk around friends and relatives in case they would forget, & # 39; she said.

The family is now particularly vigilant when it comes to Cody getting sick because he could not get his four-month vaccinations because he received blood products during his operation.

& # 39; We are extremely careful with any illnesses around him because we simply cannot risk getting sick. A cold can have him in the hospital, & Mrs. Curreen said.

The family of four must also be extra careful with oral hygiene, as any infection in Cody's mouth goes straight to his heart.

The couple are not sure what the future of Cody will bring, and was told last week that their cardiologist & # 39; nervous & # 39; is about what's coming for the six month old

The couple are not sure what the future of Cody will bring, and was told last week that their cardiologist & # 39; nervous & # 39; is about what's coming for the six month old

The couple are not sure what the future of Cody will bring, and was told last week that their cardiologist & # 39; nervous & # 39; is about what's coming for the six month old

Due to Cody & # 39; s challenging start to life, he & # 39; is delayed & # 39; in normal milestones for children, such as raising his head and rolling over.

He also experiences nightmares caused by his medication, but Mr. and Mrs. Curreen were told to grow out of sleep disorders.

& # 39; Adam and I still experience fear for his future and are caused by certain things, such as the one he wore on the day he was operated on, types of food we ate at the hospital, looking back on photos & # 39; s and video & # 39; s and going to the hospital appointments, & Mrs. Curreen said.

The couple are not sure what the future of Cody will bring, and was told last week that their cardiologist & # 39; nervous & # 39; is about what's coming for the six month old.

& # 39; After talking to other parents of children with similar conditions, they seem to be a decent & # 39; & # 39; normal & # 39; & # 39; have youth with regard to their learning and development and can participate in certain sports and activities, & # 39; she said.

& # 39; He'll get tired more easily than other kids, so maybe he's not a sportsman that poor Adam is completely devastated about.

& # 39; He will probably need medication for the rest of his life, but he has now stopped the diuretic at risk of damaging his kidneys. & # 39;

The couple has been told that he probably needs a new heart by the time Cody turns 20.

"He had the world against him, but he's just determined to prove everyone wrong," Mrs. Curreen said.

The family is now particularly vigilant when it comes to Cody getting sick because he could not get his four-month vaccinations because he received blood products during his operation

The family is now particularly vigilant when it comes to Cody getting sick because he could not get his four-month vaccinations because he received blood products during his operation

The family is now particularly vigilant when it comes to Cody getting sick because he could not get his four-month vaccinations because he received blood products during his operation

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