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Riley Dibble, born with a heart defect, suffered an almost fatal cardiac arrest just after he was delivered last year

A baby boy is a & # 39; miracle & # 39; branded after he survived three cardiac arrests and had defied the opportunity to go through an emergency procedure.

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Riley Dibble, born with a heart defect, suffered an almost fatal cardiac arrest just after he was delivered last year.

Doctors rushed Riley into the theater for open heart surgery in emergencies when he was only an hour old. But his trial was not over yet.

Riley, now 11 months old, had another cardiac arrest three months later and was taken to the hospital with an ambulance.

He suffered a third cardiac arrest during another emergency procedure, where he was only offered a two percent chance of survival.

Riley, however, went through the operation to correct his stenosis of the pulmonary artery, a defect that made one of his large arteries too narrow.

His parents, Beth and Jordan, from Staffordshire, have now told of their horror at seeing Riley dying before our eyes & # 39 ;.

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Riley Dibble, born with a heart defect, suffered an almost fatal cardiac arrest just after he was delivered last year

Riley Dibble, born with a heart defect, suffered an almost fatal cardiac arrest just after he was delivered last year

Doctors rushed Riley into the theater for open heart surgery in emergencies when he was only an hour old (pictured with his mother Beth, father Jordan and sister Millie)

Doctors rushed Riley into the theater for open heart surgery in emergencies when he was only an hour old (pictured with his mother Beth, father Jordan and sister Millie)

Doctors rushed Riley into the theater for open heart surgery in emergencies when he was only an hour old (pictured with his mother Beth, father Jordan and sister Millie)

Mrs. Dibble, 23, said: & Riley is a living, breathing miracle, one heartbeat at a time, constantly happy, no matter what life does to him. He is our heart warrior. & # 39;

Cardiac arrest occurs when the heart suddenly stops pumping blood through the body. They are more serious than heart attacks.

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Riley will have to undergo surgery again in the future, but has an almost constant smile on his face as he approaches his first birthday.

Riley, who has a three year old sister named Millie, was kept away from his parents five hours after the first operation.

It took five days for his parents to hold him. He was released from the hospital a week after his birth.

Three months later, Riley began to feel bad and an ash-gray color changed. His parents immediately called 111.

Operators decided to send an ambulance to take him directly to the Royal Stoke University Hospital.

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Upon arrival, doctors noted that he had a cardiac arrest and that he had to be resuscitated, StokeOnTrentLive reports.

Riley, now 11 months old, suffered another cardiac arrest three months later and was taken to an ambulance hospital (shown in the hospital)

Riley, now 11 months old, suffered another cardiac arrest three months later and was taken to an ambulance hospital (shown in the hospital)

Riley, now 11 months old, suffered another cardiac arrest three months later and was taken to an ambulance hospital (shown in the hospital)

He suffered a third cardiac arrest during another emergency procedure to correct his pulmonary artery stenosis, which means that one of his large arteries is too narrow

He suffered a third cardiac arrest during another emergency procedure to correct his pulmonary artery stenosis, which means that one of his large arteries is too narrow

He suffered a third cardiac arrest during another emergency procedure to correct his pulmonary artery stenosis, which means that one of his large arteries is too narrow

Riley will have to undergo surgery again in the future, but has an almost constant smile on his face as he approaches his first birthday
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Riley will have to undergo surgery again in the future, but has an almost constant smile on his face as he approaches his first birthday

Riley will have to undergo surgery again in the future, but has an almost constant smile on his face as he approaches his first birthday

Mrs. Dibble, 23, said: & Riley is a living, breathing miracle, one heartbeat at a time, constantly happy, no matter what life does to him & # 39; (they are shown together)

Mrs. Dibble, 23, said: & Riley is a living, breathing miracle, one heartbeat at a time, constantly happy, no matter what life does to him & # 39; (they are shown together)

Mrs. Dibble, 23, said: & Riley is a living, breathing miracle, one heartbeat at a time, constantly happy, no matter what life does to him & # 39; (they are shown together)

Mrs. Dibble said: & My poor baby gasped, his eyes were glassy. He was recessing as he breathed and made these awful moaning noises. & # 39;

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A doctor told the parents that Riley had to be transferred to the Birmingham Children & # 39; s Hospital. He needed a tube that inserted into his windpipe to keep his airways open.

Recalling that moment, Mrs. Dibble said: “The doctor didn't think he would survive, but if he wasn't intubated, he wouldn't make it to Birmingham.

WHAT IS A CARDIAC JUDGMENT?

Cardiac arrest occurs when the heart suddenly stops pumping blood around the body, which is usually due to a problem with electrical signals in the organ.

Because of this, the brain is starved by oxygen, so that patients do not breathe and lose consciousness.

In the UK, more than 30,000 cardiac arrests take place outside the hospital for a year, compared to more than 356,000 in the US.

Cardiac arrest is different from heart attacks, the latter occurring when blood flow to the heart muscle is interrupted by a clot in one of the coronary arteries.

Common causes are heart attacks, heart conditions and heart muscle inflammation.

Drug overdose and losing a large amount of blood can also be to blame.

Giving an electric shock through the chest wall through a defibrillator can restart the heart.

In the meantime, CPR can circulate the oxygen around the body.

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& # 39; We were lit in blue to Birmingham, where about 30 different people were talking to us about how my baby would survive.

& # 39; Riley & # 39; s heart function hardly existed. His heart failed, you could see it by looking at him. Riley died right before our eyes. & # 39;

Doctors decided that Riley needed a heart catheterization – which sends dye around the heart to check the function – to diagnose the problem.

But his chances of surviving that procedure were set at only 50/50 because he was so weak.

However, Riley did get through and it was discovered that he had a lung artery stenosis.

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The heart defect means that it has narrow veins, making it difficult for the blood to reach the lungs and absorb oxygen.

Riley needed surgery immediately, but a surgeon told his parents again that it was highly unlikely that he would survive.

& # 39; The surgeon said we have two options, take him back to intensive care and let him go, let him die in our arms; or do the operation, & said Mr. Dibble (24).

& # 39; But he said he was pretty sure that Riley would die on the operating table. I wanted a number for his chances and the surgeon said two percent.

& # 39; It was a terrible decision to take on the spot, but he had fought so far, who should we say.

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& # 39; We thought that if we had not given him the best chance of survival, we would ask the rest of our lives: & # 39; What if & # 39;. & # 39;

Surgeons then fought for 12 hours to save Riley's life. He survived – but suffered a stroke during the operation.

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