Panda ignores frisky mommy to enjoy snacks instead – and she won’t be in heat for another year

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This is the hilarious moment when a male panda happily chews on a bamboo shoot, completely oblivious to the fact that a female is grinding against him and trying to mate.

The video, shot at the Copenhagen Zoo, shows the heated female with arched back as she waits for the mating ritual to begin.

But instead of being obliging, the male, Xing Er, seems totally oblivious and eats his bamboo snack instead.

In another clip, he approaches Mao Sun and gives her a quick sniff, but then jumps away from her.

In an attempt to get the action going, Mao Sun later approaches Xing Er and presses her back against him.

Again, the male flops to the ground and continues to chew the bamboo.

The images, taken by photographer Frank Ronsholt, are from an attempt last month to encourage the two pandas to mate.

The male panda, Xing Er, seems oblivious when Mao Sun rubs her against him at the Copenhagen Zoo

The male panda, Xing Er, seems oblivious when Mao Sun rubs her against him at the Copenhagen Zoo

He lays his face on the ground before chewing bamboo, while Mao Sun tries desperately to get his attention

He lays his face on the ground before chewing bamboo, while Mao Sun tries desperately to get his attention

A zoo spokesman said: ‘The female, Mao Sun, is in heat and ready to mate once a year.

The male panda, Xing Er, is said to mate with her, but he may be too young to know what to do.

‘When she’s out of heat – it only takes 12-36 hours – the two pandas are separated again because pandas usually live alone.

“They only get together once a year to mate.”

The female stroked the male's back with her buttocks, but her advances went completely unnoticed

‘Typical!’: The two pandas went viral online with the video of the female’s unanswered advances receiving thousands of likes on social media

Xing Er smiles when he chews bamboo while Mao Sun rubs himself desperately on his back to try and get him to mate as she won't be in heat for another year

Xing Er smiles when he chews bamboo while Mao Sun rubs himself desperately on his back to try and get him to mate as she won’t be in heat for another year

Copenhagen Zoo posted the video to Instagram, where it has attracted more than 3,900 likes to date.

The message was captioned, “How does the pandas’ attempt at natural mating go on day two, you wonder?”

Viewers were left stuck by the screen.

One person commented, “Maybe you should put them together somewhere without bamboo.”

“It’s like he doesn’t quite understand a hint,” said another person.

Another commented, “It’s no wonder they’re in danger – and it’s probably not just man’s fault.” [sic]

Another viewer seemed to feel the female’s pain and said it was “typical.”

Someone else defended the male panda and said, “He’s nervous to see if there is actually permission.”

“Have you considered taking the food away so it doesn’t get so distracted?” another person advised.

Xing Er (pictured with Pernille Goerup Andersen on April 2, 2020) is the youngest of a pair of twin brothers born in 2013. His name means 'star two' in Mandarin.  His elder sibling is called Xing Yi, or 'star one', and he lives at the Guangzhou Zoo

Xing Er (pictured with Pernille Goerup Andersen on April 2, 2020) is the youngest of a pair of twin brothers born in 2013. His name means ‘star two’ in Mandarin. His elder sibling is called Xing Yi, or ‘star one’, and he lives at the Guangzhou Zoo

Danish zookeeper Rasmus Pedersen will be seen with panda Mao Sun at Giant Panda Breeding's Chengdu Research Base in Chengdu on April 2, 2020.  Mao Sun would be a quiet girl and would like to spend time alone.  Her name means 'bamboo shoot'

Danish zookeeper Rasmus Pedersen will be seen with panda Mao Sun at Giant Panda Breeding’s Chengdu Research Base in Chengdu on April 2, 2020. Mao Sun would be a quiet girl and would like to spend time alone. Her name means ‘bamboo shoot’

One person joked, “The way to the male heart apparently still goes through the stomach.”

Xing Er made headlines last June when he made a daring escape from the enclosure and roamed the park, only to be put to rest with an arrow and caught again.

He arrived at the zoo in 2019 and was caught CCTV as he emerged from his brand new £ 21.6 million Panda House.

Video footage showed the panda crawling along a metal pole, making its way along three electrical wires, before crawling into the garden.

Xing Er and Mao Sun arrived at the Denmark Zoo after being sent from their home country of China with half a ton of their favorite snack: bamboo.

They were the first pandas ever loaned to Denmark.

Giant pandas should eat 20-40 pounds of bamboo every day

Although the numbers are slowly increasing, the giant panda remains one of the rarest bears in the world and is classified as a vulnerable species.

An estimated 1,864 giant pandas live in the wild – in southwest China – and 548 in zoos and breeding centers around the world.

Experts are unclear how old giant pandas can get in the wild, but the oldest panda raised in captivity to date was 38 years old.

The wild panda’s diet consists of 99 percent bamboo, the remaining percent consisting of small rodents.

Four-month-old baby giant panda Xiang Xiang undergoes physical examination at Ueno Zoo in Tokyo on Oct. 10, 2017

Four-month-old baby giant panda Xiang Xiang undergoes physical examination at Ueno Zoo in Tokyo on Oct. 10, 2017

Giant pandas need to consume about 20 to 40 pounds (10 to 20 kilograms) of bamboo every day to get the nutrients they need.

They are about three to four feet tall when standing on all four legs.

Giant pandas reach breeding maturity between four and eight years. They can be reproductive for up to about 20 years.

Female pandas ovulate only once a year, in the spring. A short period of two to three days around ovulation is the only time a giant panda can conceive.

Cubs don’t open their eyes until they are six to eight weeks old and cannot move on their own until after three months.

A newborn panda is about the size of a piece of butter, or about 1 / 900th the size of its mother.

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