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Dr. Muzaffar Ghanghro is said to have used infected syringes in children

Up to 900 children are now infected with HIV by & # 39; rogue doctor & # 39; who has reused contaminated syringes in Pakistan

  • Dr. Muzaffar Ghanghro has been accused of negligence and manslaughter
  • A parent said he saw the pediatrician sniffing through a bin for a needle
  • Health officials fear that the number of infected people may be much higher
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Dr. Muzaffar Ghanghro is said to have used infected syringes in children

Dr. Muzaffar Ghanghro is said to have used infected syringes in children

Nearly 900 children in a Pakistani city have tested positive for HIV after a rogue doctor has reused infected syringes.

Earlier this year it was reported that 500 cases of the virus had broken out in Ratodero.

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But now the figure is as high as 1,100, with 900 children, with health officials fearing hundreds more after pediatrician Dr. Muzaffar Ghanghro has reportedly used infected syringes.

The doctor charged 16p per visit and was one of the cheapest in the city.

A quarter of the city's 200,000 residents have been tested so far, causing health officials to fear that the number could be much higher, according to The New York Times.

He was later arrested and charged with negligence and manslaughter after the scale of the outbreak became known.

Dr. Ghanghro has not yet been convicted and is still working as a doctor in a public hospital on the outskirts of the city.

The lack of awareness about HIV has led some of the 900 infected children to be avoided by their friends and forced to sit alone

The lack of awareness about HIV has led some of the 900 infected children to be avoided by their friends and forced to sit alone

The lack of awareness about HIV has led some of the 900 infected children to be avoided by their friends and forced to sit alone

Pakistani villagers are waiting outside a hospital for blood tests for HIV in a hospital in a village near Ratodero
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Pakistani villagers are waiting outside a hospital for blood tests for HIV in a hospital in a village near Ratodero

Pakistani villagers are waiting outside a hospital for blood tests for HIV in a hospital in a village near Ratodero

Imtiaz Jalbani had six of his children treated by the doctor and once said that he had seen him rummage through a trash can for an old six-year-old needle from his son, who was later diagnosed as HIV positive.

Four of Mr. Jalbani's children have since been tested positive for HIV and the two youngest have died.

Another parent said that Dr. Ghanghro used the same drop in 50 children without changing the needle.

A quarter of the city's 200,000 residents have been tested so far, causing health officials to fear that the number could be much higher
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A quarter of the city's 200,000 residents have been tested so far, causing health officials to fear that the number could be much higher

A quarter of the city's 200,000 residents have been tested so far, causing health officials to fear that the number could be much higher

The pediatrician has denied the accusations and insists that he is innocent.

Officials are unlikely to be the only source of the outbreak after seeing other doctors in Rotadero after visiting health workers and re-using dentists with non-sterilized tools.

The lack of awareness about HIV has led some of the 900 infected children to be avoided by their friends and forced to sit alone for fear that the virus can be transmitted by touch.

HOW IS HIV SENT AND PREVENTED?

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HIV is spread through body fluids such as sperm or blood.

It is usually passed on during unprotected sex, including oral and anal sex.

It can also be passed on by using a needle or syringe.

Using a condom during sex is one of the best ways to prevent you from getting HIV, as well as other sexually transmitted diseases (STDs).

Anyone can get HIV if they have unprotected sex, but gay men are among the risk groups.

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Women who have only had sex with women are at low risk.

The FDA has approved more than two dozen antiretroviral drugs to treat HIV infections.

They are often divided into six groups because they work in different ways.

Doctors recommend a combination or & # 39; cocktail & # 39; to take from at least two of them.

It is called antiretroviral therapy or ART and cannot cure HIV, but the drugs can prolong life and reduce the risk of transmission.

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