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Orphan baby elephant returns to her caregiver to lie on his lap

Nobody wants to play with me – can I have a hug? Orphan baby elephant returns to her caretaker to lie on his lap after being released into the wild but rejected by her herd

  • Two-year-old jumbo elephant named Chabakeaw was rescued by natural officers after she locked herself in the mud in Bueng Kan, northeast Thailand
  • She was raised by hand for five months before being released into the wild again
  • Only two days after her release into the wild, officers found her abandoned
  • Some believe she was abandoned because she had been in contact with people for so long

This is the heart-warming moment when an orphan elephant returns to her caregiver's lap – days after he is released into the wild and rejected by her own herd.

The two-year-old jumbo named Chabakeaw was caught in mud only on April 4 in Bueng Kan, northeast Thailand, and was rescued by natural officers.

After raising and feeding for five months by hand, the ward decided to return the baby to its natural herd on September 18.

Orphan baby elephant Chabakeaw returns to her caregiver after she was found abandoned by her wild herd in northeastern Thailand

Orphan baby elephant Chabakeaw returns to her caregiver after she was found abandoned by her wild herd in northeastern Thailand

The two-year-old baby was raised by hand for five months by nature officers before being released into the wild again. The officers believe that her time spent with people from about a young age would have made it difficult for the herd to accept her

The two-year-old baby was raised by hand for five months by nature officers before being released into the wild again. The officers believe that her time spent with people from about a young age would have made it difficult for the herd to accept her

The two-year-old baby was raised by hand for five months by nature officers before being released into the wild again. The officers believe that her time spent with people from about a young age would have made it difficult for the herd to accept her

Chabakeaw can be seen snooping around her human & # 39; parent & # 39; before she settled in his lap for a nap

Chabakeaw can be seen snooping around her human & # 39; parent & # 39; before she settled in his lap for a nap

Chabakeaw can be seen snooping around her human & # 39; parent & # 39; before she settled in his lap for a nap

On 20 September, however, the officers discovered that she had been abandoned again, about a mile away from the release location.

She was then taken care of again.

Recordings from last Friday afternoon show the adorable moment when Chabakeaw is in the lap of her human & # 39; parent & # 39; curled for a nap, safe in the safety and comfort of her savior.

Pichet Noonto, an elephant specialist, said they will take care of her while planning her future. He added that they may not be able to release her into the wild anymore

Pichet Noonto, an elephant specialist, said they will take care of her while planning her future. He added that they may not be able to release her into the wild anymore

Pichet Noonto, an elephant specialist, said they will take care of her while planning her future. He added that they may not be able to release her into the wild anymore

Chabakeaw was rescued in April after officers had caught her in mud in Northeast Thailand

Chabakeaw was rescued in April after officers had caught her in mud in Northeast Thailand

Chabakeaw was rescued in April after officers had caught her in mud in Northeast Thailand

Here is her human & # 39; parent & # 39; to see who strokes her after she has laid down for a sleep

Here is her human & # 39; parent & # 39; to see who strokes her after she has laid down for a sleep

Here is her human & # 39; parent & # 39; to see who strokes her after she has laid down for a sleep

Pichet Noonto, an elephant specialist from the IUCN Species Survival Commission, explained that the problem with Chabakeaw is that she cannot be absorbed in the herd after she was left behind when she was just a baby.

He said: We believe she was not accepted by the herd leader, which is due to the fact that she has been raised by people for more than five months. She would have had trouble adapting to the behavior of the elephant in the wild and would be kicked away.

& # 39; We will take care of her while planning her future, but sending her back to the herd may not be one of the options. & # 39;

. [TagsToTranslate] Dailymail