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Orangutan families form a ‘very special bond’ with otters in a Belgian zoo

Otterly cute! Orangutan families form a ‘very special bond’ with the family who share their stay in a Belgian zoo

  • Three orangutans in Pairi Daiza zoo in Belgium share their stay with otters
  • The two types have a ‘very special bond’ and are often played together
  • The staff decided to lead the Asian otters river with small claws through the exhibition of the monkeys

A family of orangutans has formed a ‘very special bond’ with the otters who share their stay in a Belgian zoo.

The three orangutans, at the Pairi Daiza zoo in Brugelette, first met the Asian otters with small claws after staff decided to let their river flow through the area of ​​the monkeys.

Extraordinary photos show the orangutan family – Ujian, 24, Sari, 15, and their son Bernai, three – greeting their unusual friends as they run through the fence.

Another image shows the youngest orangutan, Berani, who seems to be playing hide-and-seek with an otter resting under a wooden platform.

Extraordinary photos capture a family of orangutans who have developed a 'very special bond' with the otters sharing their stay at a Belgian zoo

Extraordinary photos capture a family of orangutans who have developed a ‘very special bond’ with the otters sharing their stay at a Belgian zoo

However, the elder prefers to attract the attention of the entire audience and entertain them as a group.

The zoo claims that allowing two animal species to live and interact together is “an enrichment” for both parties.

Pairi Daiza zoo spokesperson Mathieu Goedefroy said: ‘Two factors are very important for the welfare of a captive animal: the size of its enclosure, but also the quality of its enclosure.

“This means that an animal – and this is even more the case with orangutans, with whom humans share 97 percent of their DNA – must be occupied, occupied, challenged and occupied at all times mentally, emotionally and physically.

The three orangutans, at Pairi Daiza zoo in Brugelette, first met the Asian otters with small claws after staff decided to let their river flow through the monkey area

The three orangutans, at Pairi Daiza zoo in Brugelette, first met the Asian otters with small claws after staff decided to let their river flow through the monkey area

The three orangutans, at Pairi Daiza zoo in Brugelette, first met the Asian otters with small claws after staff decided to let their river flow through the monkey area

Another image shows the youngest orangutan, Berani, who seems to be playing hide and seek with an otter resting under a wooden platform

Another image shows the youngest orangutan, Berani, who seems to be playing hide and seek with an otter resting under a wooden platform

Another image shows the youngest orangutan, Berani, who seems to be playing hide and seek with an otter resting under a wooden platform

“For this we have a very strong” enrichment program “for our orangutans, where our keepers entertain them all day long with brain games, riddles, puzzles and other things to train their intelligence.

One of the ‘enrichments’ is to have different animal species together so that they can communicate with each other.

“That’s why we chose to let an otter family live in the river that runs through the orangutan region.”

Goedefroy added that the otters “really enjoy getting out of the water on the orangutan island to play with their big furry friends.”

The zoo claims that allowing two species of animals to live and interact together is 'enrichment' for both parties

The zoo claims that allowing two species to live and interact together is an enrichment for both parties

The zoo claims that allowing two species to live and interact together is an enrichment for both parties

Photos show the orangutan family - Ujian, 24, Sari, 15, and their son Bernai, three - watching their unusual friends as they run through the fence

Photos show the orangutan family - Ujian, 24, Sari, 15, and their son Bernai, three - watching their unusual friends as they run through the fence

Photos show the orangutan family – Ujian, 24, Sari, 15, and their son Bernai, three – watching their unusual friends as they run through the fence

“Baby Berani and Dad Ujian in particular have developed a very special bond with their neighbors,” he said.

“It makes life more fun and interesting for both species, making it a very successful experiment.”

Ujian, Sari and Berani moved from Germany to the award-winning zoo in 2017.

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