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Orangutan cub clings to its mother for dear life

It is another tough day to look after the children … but a hug makes it all worthwhile! Baby orangutan clings to its mother as it gathers food in beautiful images

  • Photographer Julia Wimmerlin took this magical photo in Tanjung Putin National Park, Indonesia
  • While the mother clings to the trees, the three-month-old cub clings to his mother's chest and back
  • Orangutans will start weaning their cubs around 3 to 4 years, but some will occasionally feed them up to 7

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Head in hands after a long day with a three month old, it is an expression that every parent can identify with. And this orangutan is no different.

With one hand on her head as her newborn baby clings tightly to her breast, she has no time to stop while she collects food for them, while her little baby feeds on her as she climbs.

Photographer Julia Wimmerlin took this magical series of photos in Tanjung Puting National Park, Indonesia.

With her head in her hands, the mother expertly hangs on the branch of a tree that reaches through the canopy in Tanjung Puting National Park, Indonesia

With her head in her hands, the mother expertly hangs on the branch of a tree that reaches through the canopy in Tanjung Puting National Park, Indonesia

With her head in her hands, the mother expertly hangs on the branch of a tree that reaches through the canopy in Tanjung Puting National Park, Indonesia

With her head in her hands, the mother expertly hangs on the branch of a tree that reaches through the canopy in Tanjung Puting National Park, Indonesia

These powerful photos show an orangutan cub clinging to its mother's body as it leafs through the jungle and picks ripe bananas from the trees for the two of them

These powerful photos show an orangutan cub clinging to its mother's body as it leafs through the jungle and picks ripe bananas from the trees for the two of them

These powerful photos show an orangutan cub clinging to its mother's body as it leafs through the jungle and picks ripe bananas from the trees for the two of them

These photo afters show a moment of tenderness from the cub to his mother, stroked her chin (photo on the left) as she grasps tightly against the fur on her back (photo on the right)

These photo afters show a moment of tenderness from the cub to his mother, stroked her chin (photo on the left) as she grasps tightly against the fur on her back (photo on the right)

These photo afters show a moment of tenderness from the cub to his mother, stroked her chin (photo on the left) as she grasps tightly against the fur on her back (photo on the right)

These photo afters show a moment of tenderness from the cub to his mother, stroked her chin (photo on the left) as she grasps tightly against the fur on her back (photo on the right)

These photo afters show a moment of tenderness of the cub to his mother as she strokes her chin (photo left) while she grasps tightly against the fur on her back (photo right). Photographer Julia Wimmerlin said she thought this was the most human and heart-warming scene she had seen

She said: & # 39; When I saw this particular mother and baby, I just couldn't believe my happiness – this was the most human-like, heart-warming scene I've seen.

& # 39; The baby is only about two to three months old, so just like a human baby, she is completely dependent on her mother.

& # 39; I was surprised at how human the interaction between the couple was.

& # 39; This was one of the two daily & # 39; deliveries & # 39; of orangutan food to the feeding station.

Orangutans begin to wean their young between the ages of three and four, although some will occasionally care for their cubs up to seven years old

Orangutans begin to wean their young between the ages of three and four, although some will occasionally care for their cubs up to seven years old

Orangutans begin to wean their young between the ages of three and four, although some will occasionally care for their cubs up to seven years old

Orangutans begin to wean their young between the ages of three and four, although some will occasionally care for their cubs up to seven years old

Orangutans begin to wean their young between the ages of three and four, although some will occasionally care for their cubs up to seven years old

Pictured left: a rare glimpse of the baby looking straight into the camera. Pictured on the right: while the mother eats part of the food she has found, the baby nurses

Pictured left: a rare glimpse of the baby looking straight into the camera. Pictured on the right: while the mother eats part of the food she has found, the baby nurses

Pictured left: a rare glimpse of the baby looking straight into the camera. Pictured on the right: while the mother eats part of the food she has found, the baby nurses

Pictured left: a rare glimpse of the baby looking straight into the camera. Pictured on the right: while the mother eats part of the food she has found, the baby nurses

Pictured left: a rare glimpse of the baby looking straight into the camera. Pictured on the right: while the mother eats part of the food she has found, the baby nurses

& # 39; You can never predict what will happen because these power supplies are usually & # 39; a helping hand for ex-residents of rehabilitation centers.

Even after being released into the wild, they may have difficulty finding food.

& # 39; This time was the first in & # 39; food queue & king of this area – a huge alpha male who was entertained with food and absolutely in no hurry.

& # 39; The power and dominance of a king is so strong that no one dares to come to get some food until the king has finished his meal.

The orangutan kicks its leg up for a new foot on the tree while the cub finds its own way to hold onto its mother's fur. The photos were taken after food was omitted for orangutans in the area because primates may have difficulty finding food if particularly dominant males are around

The orangutan kicks its leg up for a new foot on the tree while the cub finds its own way to hold onto its mother's fur. The photos were taken after food was omitted for orangutans in the area because primates may have difficulty finding food if particularly dominant males are around

The orangutan kicks its leg up for a new foot on the tree while the cub finds its own way to hold onto its mother's fur. The photos were taken after food was omitted for orangutans in the area because primates may have difficulty finding food if particularly dominant males are around

The orangutan kicks its leg up for a new foot on the tree while the cub finds its own way to hold onto its mother's fur. The photos were taken after food was omitted for orangutans in the area because primates may have difficulty finding food if particularly dominant males are around

The orangutan kicks its leg up for a new foot on the tree while the cub finds its own way to hold onto its mother's fur. The photos were taken after food was omitted for orangutans in the area because primates may have difficulty finding food if particularly dominant males are around

& # 39; This mother seemed very impatient to eat, so she scrambled down, grabbed everything she could and quickly ran up the tree trunk. That is why you see her arms with different food and that you can count at least three oranges in her mouth.

& # 39; This went on for a while: eat upstairs – go downstairs to grab some food quickly and go up again quickly.

& # 39; The little baby clung to Mama as she climbed the trees – she even seemed to be taking a nap at one point. & # 39; I just thought it was great. & # 39;

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