Home Tech Orange is the new black! Adorable monkey with bright ginger fur is born at a zoo in Bedfordshire – despite both its parents being monochromatic

Orange is the new black! Adorable monkey with bright ginger fur is born at a zoo in Bedfordshire – despite both its parents being monochromatic

by Elijah
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A baby monkey with bright orange fur and described by keepers as a
  • Whipsnade Zoo is now home to a week-old François’s langur monkey
  • Babies are born with striking orange hair, but turn black with age

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A baby monkey with bright orange fur and described by keepers as a “ray of sunshine” was born at a conservation zoo in Bedfordshire.

Whipsnade Zoo is now home to a one-week-old François’s langur, which was born to its mother Lulu and father Wang in the early hours of February 17.

In contrast to the monochrome coats of adult François langurs, the babies are born with striking orange hair, with images showing the flame-colored newborn nestled in its mother’s dark black fur.

The monkey’s birth has been described as a “sign of hope” for its endangered species.

A baby monkey with bright orange fur and described by keepers as a “ray of sunshine” was born at a conservation zoo in Bedfordshire.

In contrast to the monochrome coats of adult François langurs, the babies are born with striking orange hair, with images showing the flame-colored newborn nestled in its mother's dark black fur.

In contrast to the monochrome coats of adult François langurs, the babies are born with striking orange hair, with images showing the flame-colored newborn nestled in its mother's dark black fur.

In contrast to the monochrome coats of adult François langurs, the babies are born with striking orange hair, with images showing the flame-colored newborn nestled in its mother’s dark black fur.

Whipsnade Zookeeper Amanda Robinson said the team were ecstatic when they saw Lulu cradling her bright orange baby.

“It is believed that babies are born with bright orange tufts so that parents can easily spot the young one when the troop is caring for them,” he said.

‘Over time, this hair will turn black.

‘The bright orange fur certainly makes it easier for keepers and visitors to spot the new addition!’

Native to China and northern Vietnam, François’s langurs are listed as endangered on the IUCN Red List of Threatened Species and their numbers have continued to decline in the wild, making their recent birth significant internationally. international.

“Sadly, François’s langur numbers in the wild are plummeting, so this newborn really is a ray of sunshine and a sign of hope for the species,” Ms Robinson said.

Whipsnade Zookeeper Amanda Robinson said the team were ecstatic when they saw Lulu cradling her bright orange baby.

Whipsnade Zookeeper Amanda Robinson said the team were ecstatic when they saw Lulu cradling her bright orange baby.

Whipsnade Zookeeper Amanda Robinson said the team were ecstatic when they saw Lulu cradling her bright orange baby.

Native to China and northern Vietnam, the François's langur is listed as endangered on the IUCN Red List of Threatened Species and its numbers have continued to decline in the wild, making its recent birth of international importance. .

Native to China and northern Vietnam, the François's langur is listed as endangered on the IUCN Red List of Threatened Species and its numbers have continued to decline in the wild, making its recent birth of international importance. .

Native to China and northern Vietnam, the François’s langur is listed as endangered on the IUCN Red List of Threatened Species and its numbers have continued to decline in the wild, making its recent birth of international importance. .

Conservationists estimate that only 2,000 of these primates remain in the wild.

Conservationists estimate that only 2,000 of these primates remain in the wild.

Conservationists estimate that only 2,000 of these primates remain in the wild.

In François’ langur habitat, older sister Nguyen has also been caring for the newborn, willing to share parenting responsibilities with mother Lulu.

“Nguyen has stayed close to his mother Lulu and given her a break when she needs to eat or drink,” Robinson said.

“He has been treating the newborn as if it were his own baby, which is exactly what you would see in the wild – it shows that the eight-year-old has acquired great skills from the older members of the troop.”

The baby was born as part of a European Endangered Species Breeding Program (EEP), an internationally coordinated conservation initiative that aims to increase the number of threatened species in the wild.

Conservationists estimate that only 2,000 of these primates remain in the wild, as the species faces threats from illegal hunting for meat and traditional medicinal purposes.

– The langur troop can be found at Whipsnade Zoo’s new Monkey Forest, which opens to the public on March 29.

What are Francois langurs?

Francois langurs, also known as Francois leaf monkeys, are a species of primate native to China, Vietnam and Laos.

The once abundant animals have been considered endangered since 2008 due to poaching, logging and construction works that damage their habitats. It is estimated that only about 3,000 of them remain in the wild.

They usually live in tropical rainforest terrain with steep slopes and tall trees, which has made their study difficult.

The animals are black in adulthood, with a horizontal white stripe on the face. When they are born, their fur is bright orange for a few weeks before starting to darken. It is believed that this is so that adults can see the babies better.

Francois’ langurs grow to between 12 and 17 pounds (5.4-7.7 kg) in weight and about two feet in height (60 cm). In the wild they can live about 25 years, but their lives are thought to be shorter in captivity.

Monkeys mainly eat leaves that other monkeys cannot digest, as well as shoots, fruits, flowers and bark.

They usually live in harem groups consisting of around 10 individuals, with one alpha male and numerous females that bear young.

Fountain: New England Primate Conservation

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