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Optus customers are demanding free services and no bills after personal information leak

Outraged customers demand Optus give them a whole YEAR of free service – after hackers stole the private data of millions of Australians who could leak it onto the dark web

  • Optus customers demand bill waiver after Thursday’s massive hack
  • The private information of about 10 million Optus customers has been leaked to criminals
  • The massive breach is believed to be caused by a weakness in Optus’ firewall
  • Scamwatch urged customers to check accounts and change their passwords

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Millions of Optus customers exposed to hackers through a massive security breach are demanding that their accounts be waived in compensation.

Australia’s second-largest telco revealed that 2.8 million passport and driver’s license numbers, email and home addresses, dates of birth and customer phone numbers were stolen by hackers on Thursday.

Also, the birth dates, email addresses and phone numbers of another seven million people were leaked.

Optus customers demand bill waiver after massive cyberattack leaked information of 10 million people

Optus customers demand bill waiver after massive cyberattack leaked information of 10 million people

The massive breach is considered one of the largest cyber-attacks in Australian history, with criminals exploiting a weakness in Optus’ firewall.

The apparent weakness has exposed customers, past and present, to criminal activity, and many are concerned that their highly private information will be leaked onto the dark web.

Now some customers are demanding that Optus offer free services for a whole year to compensate for the stress caused.

“How many free years of service will I get for allowing my personal information on the dark web?” wrote one person on Twitter.

Passport and driver's license numbers, email addresses, dates of birth and phone numbers of Optus customers were leaked Thursday in a massive hack.

Passport and driver's license numbers, email addresses, dates of birth and phone numbers of Optus customers were leaked Thursday in a massive hack.

Passport and driver’s license numbers, email addresses, dates of birth and phone numbers of Optus customers were leaked Thursday in a massive hack.

“Give us free (sports streaming) and waive the following bill, stupid dogs,” said another.

“So my account should be free this month,” wrote another.

Optus chief executive Kelly Rosmarin said the company is working with the Australian Federal Police to investigate the attack.

“We are devastated to learn that we have been the victims of a cyber attack that resulted in the disclosure of our customers’ personal information to someone who should not be allowed to see it,” Ms Rosmarin said in a statement.

People demand Optus provide free services and cut bills after apparent weakness in firewall leaked millions of customer information (photo, sample Optus bill)

People demand Optus provide free services and cut bills after apparent weakness in firewall leaked millions of customer information (photo, sample Optus bill)

People demand Optus provide free services and cut bills after apparent weakness in firewall leaked millions of customer information (photo, sample Optus bill)

“As soon as we knew, we took action to block the attack and immediately launched an investigation. While not everyone may be affected and our investigation is not yet complete, we want all our customers to be aware of what happened as soon as possible so they can increase their vigilance.

“We are very sorry and we understand that customers will be concerned. Rest assured that we are working hard and collaborating with all relevant authorities and organizations to help protect our customers as much as possible.”

Ms Rosmarin said no payment information was leaked but urged customers to check their bank accounts and flag any suspicious activity.

Scamwatch said Optus customers should monitor their devices and financial accounts, change passwords online and enable multi-factor authentication, set limits on bank accounts and request a ban on their credit report if fraud is suspected.

SCAMWATCH ADVICE FOR OPTUS CUSTOMERS

Scamwatch warns Optus customers to watch out for scams and take steps to secure their personal information after a cyber-attack.

A cyber attack has resulted in the disclosure of personal data of Optus customers. If you are an Optus customer, your name, date of birth, phone number and email addresses may have been released. For some customers, ID numbers, such as driver’s license or passport numbers, may be in the hands of criminals. It is important to be aware that you are at risk of identity theft and to take urgent action to prevent damage.

Optus customers must take immediate steps to secure all their accounts, especially their bank and financial accounts. You should also keep an eye out for unusual activity on your accounts and watch out for contact by scammers.

Steps you can take to protect your personal information include:

More information on how to protect yourself is available on the OAIC website.

Check the Optus website for information and contact Optus via the My Optus app or call 133 937.

Scammers can use your personal information to contact you by phone, text or email. Never click on links or give out personal or financial information to anyone who contacts you just like that. Learn how to protect yourself from scams by visiting www.scamwatch.gov.au

If you are concerned that your identity has been compromised or that you have been the victim of a scam, contact your bank immediately and call IDCARE on 1800 595 160. IDCARE is Australia’s national identity and cyber support service, for expert advice from a specialized identity and cybersecurity service. You can also report scams to Scamwatch www.scamwatch.gov.au and visit cyber.gov.au for information on cybersecurity.

Chief strategy officer at cybersecurity firm CberCX Alastair MacGibbon said Optus customers should remain vigilant.

“Personal information has been stolen,” he told ABC.

‘A lot of personal information for several million people and a little less information for about 6 million more.

“They should see if criminals impersonate them, or steal their identities, or try to get credit in their name.”

He said one way breached customers can protect themselves from financial fraud is by paying to monitor their credit usage.

“That way you will be checked by credit monitoring services if someone has used your name and other details to get credit,” Mr MacGibbon said.

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