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Opinion poll: Nearly two-thirds of the British would feel uncomfortable going to the pub after closing

Coronaphobia is still cautious Britain: Nearly two-thirds of Britons would feel uncomfortable going to the pub and going on a foreign holiday when the lockout ends – as less than HALF want to get back to work

  • Survey by Ipsos Mori shows that many people are concerned about life after the lockdown
  • Some 65 percent said they would feel uncomfortable attending the public meeting
  • Six out of ten people would feel uncomfortable returning to pubs and restaurants
  • Meanwhile, only 47 percent said they would like to return to work

Nearly two-thirds of the British would feel uncomfortable going to the pub or taking a vacation abroad when the lockout ends, according to a new survey suggesting that ‘coronaphobia’ is still in the UK’s grip.

About 60 percent of the nation feels uncomfortable going to a bar or restaurant with the same number saying the same about a vacation abroad.

Meanwhile, less than half of people say they feel comfortable returning to their workplace, and 65 percent feel uncomfortable attending a large public meeting.

The latest poll issues published by Ipsos Mori suggest that Boris Johnson must face a tough fight to bring Britain back to normal.

The polling station said that although the prime minister has prepared his roadmap for leaving the lockdown, “the public vote doesn’t seem to have shifted very significantly” and “there are still many concerns to be overcome.”

A new survey, conducted by Ipsos Mori, found that 65 percent of people would feel uncomfortable attending public meetings after closure, as they did before the outbreak

A new survey, conducted by Ipsos Mori, found that 65 percent of people would feel uncomfortable attending public meetings after closure, as they did before the outbreak

A new survey, conducted by Ipsos Mori, found that 65 percent of people would feel uncomfortable attending public meetings after closure, as they did before the outbreak

Respondents to the survey were told to imagine that the block would have ended completely within a month.

Then they were asked how much they would enjoy doing things the same way they did before the outbreak.

The findings found that six out of ten people would be uncomfortable or not at all comfortable going to a bar or restaurant.

About three in ten (29 percent) said they would feel very comfortable or fairly comfortable.

While on vacation abroad, only 20 percent said they would feel very or fairly comfortable, compared to 60 percent who said it was not very comfortable or not comfortable at all.

At large gatherings of people, only 18 percent said they would feel comfortable the way they did, compared to 65 percent who said they would feel uncomfortable.

Gideon Skinner, head of political research at Ipsos MORI, said: “Despite the summer holidays coming up, only two in ten people say they will go on holiday abroad comfortably if the block is lifted in the coming month.

‘Our findings offer more hope for those running tourism businesses in the UK, but clearly there are still many people to be reassured.

“In general, the public mood doesn’t seem to have changed much – as people look forward to seeing friends and family again, there are still many fears to overcome before life returns to normal.”

About 45 percent of people said they felt very or fairly comfortable going on holiday in the UK, compared to 44 percent who said they would feel uncomfortable.

The reason the numbers don’t go up to 100 is because people who haven’t done these activities before or who haven’t stopped are excluded.

Aside from the issues surrounding holidays, pubs and public gatherings, the poll suggests Mr. Johnson is facing a more pressing issue.

The government is actively encouraging people who cannot work from home to return to work.

But the survey found that only 47 percent of people feel very or fairly comfortable going back.

The latest poll suggests that Boris Johnson, pictured today in Downing Street, must face a tough battle to convince the nation that life can return to normal

The latest poll suggests that Boris Johnson, pictured today in Downing Street, must face a tough battle to convince the nation that life can return to normal

The latest poll suggests that Boris Johnson, pictured today in Downing Street, must face a tough battle to convince the nation that life can return to normal

Johnson's coronavirus lockout exit strategy consists of three phases, each of which should not proceed until the transmission speed has fallen

Johnson's coronavirus lockout exit strategy consists of three phases, each of which should not proceed until the transmission speed has fallen

Johnson’s coronavirus lockout exit strategy consists of three phases, each of which should not proceed until the transmission speed has fallen

Nearly four in ten (38 percent) said they were uncomfortable or uncomfortable with the prospect.

There also seems to be major concern about the government’s plans to reopen primary schools, with 50 percent of people saying they are uncomfortable with their children returning to classrooms.

When Mr. Johnson outlined his lockdown exit strategy, he said it would consist of three phases.

The first, now established, allows people to exercise as much as they want and to meet another person from outside their household as long as they distance themselves socially.

In the second phase, possibly from 1 June, the phased reopening of primary schools and some non-essential shops will take place.

Phase three could then begin in July with the reopening of places of worship, leisure, and hospitality.

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