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One of Australia’s highest-ranking police officers admits the patrol car stolen from his home was UNLOCKED

One of Australia’s top police officers turns red after admitting the police car stolen from outside his home in Sydney has been unlocked.

  • Deputy Commissioner Jeff Loy left the car at his Sutherland Shire estate
  • The unlocked four-wheel drive had police documents and uniforms inside
  • Commissioner Loy did not break the law because the car was on his private property
  • Police whistleblowers call for greater transparency about theft

One of Australia’s top police officers has been hit on the wrist after admitting that he hadn’t locked his secret police car before it was stolen from outside his home in Sydney.

The unlocked four-wheel drive of New South Wales Deputy Police Commissioner Jeff Loy, with police documents and uniforms in it, was stolen from his property in Sutherland Shire in late April.

A report from Parliament submitted last week said that “police uniform items and documents were in the vehicle,” but Mr. Loy had left no weapons.

The items were later found after a police investigation.

NSW Police Commissioner Mick Fuller was questioned by Robert Borsak, leader of Shooters’ Fishers and Farmers, about how the car’s security system could have been breached ABC reported.

Deputy Commissioner Jeff Loy's unlocked four-wheel drive, which contained police documents and uniforms, was stolen from his property in Sutherland Shire

Deputy Commissioner Jeff Loy’s unlocked four-wheel drive, which contained police documents and uniforms, was stolen from his property in Sutherland Shire

A police spokesman said Deputy Commissioner Loy (photo) did not violate traffic rules because the car was parked on his private property

A police spokesman said Deputy Commissioner Loy (photo) did not violate traffic rules because the car was parked on his private property

A police spokesman said Deputy Commissioner Loy (photo) did not violate traffic rules because the car was parked on his private property

In NSW, it is illegal to unlock a parked car on public roads, with fines of $ 2,200.

But a police spokesman said Deputy Commissioner Loy was not breaking traffic rules because the car was on his private property.

The spokesman said that Mr Fuller warned his deputy about the security breach.

“Deputy Commissioner Loy has officially spoken to Commissioner Fuller on the matter and clearly understands his obligations regarding the security of his police vehicle,” said the spokesman.

Police whistleblower and transparency campaigner Richard McDonald claimed the NSW police should have said more about the theft.

“Certainly, these days it is very difficult to steal a motor vehicle unless the thief has the keys to that vehicle,” he said.

“If an ordinary policeman left a police vehicle unlocked and that car was stolen, I would certainly expect that policeman to experience the full wrath of the professional standards command.”

Greens Member of Parliament David Shoebridge said it is worrying that sensitive documents may have fallen into the wrong hands from the car.

NSW police continue to investigate car theft.

It is believed that several other cars in Mr. Loy’s street were targeted the same night.

NSW Police Commissioner Mick Fuller (pictured) was investigated by Shooters' Fishers and Farmers leader Robert Borsak on how the car's security system could have been breached

NSW Police Commissioner Mick Fuller (pictured) was investigated by Shooters' Fishers and Farmers leader Robert Borsak on how the car's security system could have been breached

NSW Police Commissioner Mick Fuller (pictured) was investigated by Shooters’ Fishers and Farmers leader Robert Borsak on how the car’s security system could have been breached

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