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One in ten employees is freezing retirement savings during the Covid-19 crisis

One in 10 employees freezes retirement savings during the Covid-19 crisis, risking losing tens of thousands from retirement pots

  • People stop saving for retirement because they need money for essentials
  • Other reasons are being fired or leave, Canada Life says
  • A 30-year-old making £ 30,000 will lose more than £ 45,000 by taking a three-year break from contributions
  • This is how you arrange your pension: Below you will find guides for savers in their twenties and older

Nearly a quarter of workers have stopped paying their pension or are actively considering it as the coronavirus pandemic wreaks havoc on people’s finances, new research reveals.

Interrupting contributions can blow a hole in future retirement pots, with a 30-year-old earning £ 30,000 could lose more than £ 45,000 by opting out of auto-pension enrollment for three years.

The most common reason to take a break from retirement savings was needing money for essential expenses, but many people mentioned layoffs or leave, according to Canada Life’s research.

Coronavirus Crisis: What To Do About Your Retirement If You Cash Out Or Get Fired? Find out below

Coronavirus Crisis: What To Do About Your Retirement If You Cash Out Or Get Fired? Find out below

Pension experts are urging people to keep paying for pensions if they can afford them, so as not to jeopardize their chances of a decent retirement.

You can continue to pay for some types of pensions even after you have left your employer, and payments in jars based on 80% of pay are protected when you are on leave.

If you are concerned that you have not saved enough for your retirement, read our guide to arranging your retirement below.

We also have a guide for people in their twenties who want to get their retirement on track here.

One in 10 employees has interrupted retirement premiums during the coronavirus freeze, and another 13 percent are considering doing so, according to a survey of 2,000 people conducted in late August.

Canada Life looks at the impact of three-year retirement breaks on workers aged 30, 40 and 50 with different income levels, and how much extra they would need to save to fill the shortfall in the table below.

Retirement plans: Interrupting premiums can blow a hole in the pension pot (Source: Canada Life)

Retirement plans: Interrupting premiums can blow a hole in the pension pot (Source: Canada Life)

Retirement plans: Interrupting premiums can blow a hole in the pension pot (Source: Canada Life)

People enrolled automatically for pensions contribute at least 4 percent of eligible income – meaning a range between £ 6,240 and £ 50,000 in the 2020/21 tax year – while employers put in 3 percent and the government put in another 1 percent. cents in tax relief.

Those who opt out of auto-enrollment will find their employer re-enrolls them every three years, but it does so on its own schedule, usually on an ongoing basis from when it first introduced auto-enrollment, not timed when an employee dropped out.

What should you do about your pension if you run out of money or if you are fired?

Read here the three important rules to remember and what you can do with different types of retirement.

Once re-enrolled, an employee must actively log out again if that is what they want.

If you are fired and get a new job, you will automatically be enrolled in your new employer’s retirement plan if you are 22 or older and earn more than £ 10,000.

“With Covid-19 hitting personal finance harder than ever, it’s not surprising that many are starting to view their retirement contributions as discretionary,” said Andrew Tully, Canada Life’s technical director.

While a three-year retirement vacation may seem like a small hiatus in the context of a decades-long career, our analysis shows that the long-term impact of that decision can be significant.

‘All the choices that are made now can have a significant impact on quality of life after retirement, so it is very important that their impact is well understood from the start.

It is alarming to see that 13 percent of the respondents were actively thinking about a retirement vacation. However, there are some ways to mitigate the potential impact.

‘Our analysis shows that losses can be recouped at any stage of working life, as long as there is a plan to resume contributions as soon as possible.

“Savers will also need to understand that premiums need to be higher than before, and in some cases as much as a fifth for those closer to retirement.”

Who pays for what? How retirement contributions pile up under auto-enrollment schemes (source: The Pensions Advisory Service)

Who pays for what? How pension contributions pile up under auto-enrollment plans (Source: The Pensions Advisory Service)

Who pays for what? How pension contributions pile up under auto-enrollment plans (Source: The Pensions Advisory Service)

Separate recent research has shown that middle-aged savers could see their retirement take a particularly heavy blow as two recessions and a more stingy retirement system undermine their ability to provide for their old age.

The financial crash and coronavirus crisis will disrupt the earnings of many people who are currently between the ages of 40 and 55, who are also missing out on generous final pay pensions and the full benefits of auto-enrollment.

High redundancy rates among people in this age group and declining access to financial advice are other factors affecting their chances of a decent retirement.

How to arrange your pension if you are afraid it will fall short

If you’re worried about your retirement and whether you’re getting tired of it, read a full 10-step guide here to fix it.

First, research your existing pensions to get started. Broadly speaking, you should ask schedules the following:

– The current fund value

– The current transfer value – because there may be a fine to move

– Whether the pension is in a final salary or defined contribution scheme

– If there are guarantees – for example, a guaranteed annuity rate – and if you would lose them if you moved the fund

– The pension projection on the retirement age.

You can use a retirement calculator to see if you have enough – find This is Money’s here.

You need to add the forecast numbers to what you expect to get in state pension, which is currently about £ 9,100 a year if you have a full state pension.

Receive an AOW forecast here.

If you’re tempted to merge your old pensions, here are some tips on how to make a decision.

If you’ve lost track of old pensions, the government’s free tracking service is here.

Be careful when searching online for the Pension Tracing Service as many companies with similar names will appear in the results.

These also offer to look for your retirement, but try to charge or beat you for other services, and can be fraudulent.

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