One in eleven early deaths is due to lack of exercise

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Lack of exercise causes one in 11 early deaths due to increased risk of heart disease, stroke and diabetes, study finds

  • Scientists studied the medical literature on inactivity and death and illness
  • Inactivity related to dementia, heart disease, stroke, cancer and type II diabetes
  • But vigorous activity on high pollution days is linked to cardiovascular issues

One in 11 premature deaths in rich countries is caused by inactivity, scientists said yesterday.

They said the 9.3 percent figure was higher than the overall global figure of 7.2 percent – nearly one in 14.

Lack of exercise is a known risk factor for coronary heart disease, stroke, hypertension, type 2 diabetes and various cancers.

Lack of exercise is a known risk factor for coronary heart disease, stroke, hypertension, type 2 diabetes and various cancers

Lack of exercise is a known risk factor for coronary heart disease, stroke, hypertension, type 2 diabetes and various cancers

“The global burden associated with physical inactivity is significant,” the authors wrote

Led by experts at the Pennington Biomedical Research Center in Louisiana, the scientists reviewed the medical literature on inactivity and death and disease.

“The global burden associated with physical inactivity is significant,” the authors wrote.

The relative burden is greatest in countries with a high income; however, given the size of their population, the greatest number of people with physical inactivity live in middle-income countries. ‘

Inactivity was linked to 8.1 percent of dementia cases worldwide, according to the findings published in the British Journal of Sports Medicine.

A separate study from South Korea found that physical activity helped prevent cardiovascular disease.

However, according to the study in the European Heart Journal, very strenuous activity on days when air pollution is high was linked to cardiovascular problems.

Researcher Dr. Seong Rae Kim said, “Excessive physical activity is not always beneficial for cardiovascular health in younger adults.”

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