One in 500 Americans has died of Covid since the start of the pandemic, as the fourth wave continues to slow

One in 500 Americans has died from COVID-19 since the start of the pandemic, even as the fourth wave continues to show signs of ebb.

On Wednesday morning, 663,963 US residents died from the coronavirus, according to figures from Johns Hopkins University – and the country’s population stands at 331,449,281, the most recent. data from the US Census Bureau shows.

When the death toll is divided by the total population, it turns out that 0.2 percent of Americans have died from virus-related causes.

The grim milestone comes as the overall number of average COVID-19 infections continues to rise, but the rate of growth slows significantly.

According to Johns Hopkins, officials on Tuesday recorded 143,895 new cases of Covid with a seven-day moving average of 154,449.

This is a 12 percent increase from the 137,058 average reported a month ago, a dramatic drop from the 150 percent increase reported last month over a four-week period.

Nearly half of US states have seen Covid infections decrease or stabilize in the past week, an analysis of DailyMail.com data shows.

Deaths rose with 1,823 virus-related fatalities on Tuesday with a seven-day moving average of 1,873, a jump of 163 from the average of 644 reported four weeks ago.

However, experts say the number of fatalities is a lagging indicator and often doesn’t start to decline until two or three weeks after cases have fallen.

While one-time hotspots like Florida and Louisiana are improving, infection rates are still rising in some states, such as Ohio and West Virginia, fueled by few restrictions and low vaccination levels.

One in 500 Americans has died from COVID-19 since the start of the pandemic, and 1,823 virus-related deaths were recorded on Tuesday with a seven-day moving average of 1,873

On Wednesday, the US registered 143,895 new cases of Covid with a seven-day moving average of 154,449, a 12% increase from the 137,058 average reported a month ago, down from a 150% increase reported on Wednesday. a period of four weeks last month

On Wednesday, the US registered 143,895 new cases of Covid with a seven-day moving average of 154,449, a 12% increase from the 137,058 average reported a month ago, down from a 150% increase reported on Wednesday. a period of four weeks last month

Nearly half of US states have seen Covid infections decrease or remain stable in the past week

Nearly half of US states have seen Covid infections decrease or remain stable in the past week

The country is well below the terrifying peaks reached in January 202, when it averaged about 3,400 deaths and a quarter of a million cases per day.

The US provides about 900,000 vaccinations per day, up from a peak of 3.4 million per day in mid-April.

On Friday, an advisory panel of the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) will meet to discuss whether the US should start giving booster shots of the Pfizer vaccine.

Another positive is that the number of people now hospitalized with COVID-19 appears to be leveling off or even declining around 90,000, or roughly where things were in February.

Last week, President Joe Bien ordered all employers with more than 100 employees to demand vaccinations or weekly tests, a measure that affects about 80 million Americans.

And the approximately 17 million health center workers who receive federal Medicare or Medicaid will also need to be fully vaccinated.

“We read about and hear about and we see the stories of hospitalized people, people on their deathbeds among the unvaccinated in recent weeks,” Biden said when announcing the rules last week.

“This is a pandemic of unvaccinated people.”

The demands were met with resistance and threats of lawsuits from Republicans, who say people should be able to choose whether to receive the shots or not.

However, there are still US hot spots, with some states seeing an increase in cases due to low vaccination rates.

The number of positive cases and people hospitalized for the coronavirus in West Virginia broke both records as Gov Jim Justice berated residents who were still struggling to receive COVID-19 vaccines.

Last week, the number of confirmed virus cases statewide was about 8,860, breaking the weekly record of about 8,200 as of early January.

In West Virginia, the number of positive cases and people in hospital broke record levels with only 40% of all residents fully vaccinated

In West Virginia, the number of positive cases and people in hospital broke record levels with only 40% of all residents fully vaccinated

Covid cases have also risen in Ohio with 7,325 registered on Tuesday, and less than half of people in 66 of Ohio's 88 counties have been vaccinated

Covid cases have also risen in Ohio with 7,325 registered on Tuesday, and less than half of people in 66 of Ohio’s 88 counties have been vaccinated

In addition, a record 852 people were hospitalized for the virus on Monday.

That blew past the 818 set on January 5 and was a jump from 810 on Saturday. Such cases had bottomed out at 52 in early July, before rising sharply over the past two months.

West Virginia currently has the lowest vaccination rate in the nation with only 40 percent of residents fully vaccinated, according to data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).

“This is a pandemic of unvaccinated people,” Justice said at a news conference.

At the conference, Justice introduced Linda Lanier, who said her adult son, Joe Goodnite, refused to be vaccinated and contracted COVID-19 while on family vacation.

He has been in a hospital in Charleston for more than six weeks and is still on a ventilator.

Goodnite “listened to all the negative and false accusations about vaccination,” she said.

Being in the medical field myself, I tried to convince him. However, it didn’t work. He listened to his friends. He listened to social media. And he just listened to what I call the garbage that’s out there.’

But while in the hospital he could still talk,” he told people. ‘Get yourself vaccinated. You don’t want this stuff,” Lanier added.

Covid cases have also risen in Ohio with 7,325 recorded on Tuesday, with an average of 7,071 infections reported in the past week.

In addition, more than 3,200 people have been hospitalized with COVID-19, up from the 2,600 reported last week.

An analysis of the Ohio Capital Journal found that less than half of residents in most Ohio counties have been vaccinated against COVID-19.

In 66 of the state’s 88 counties, vaccination rates were found to be less than one in two people.

Health experts say they are frustrated that large numbers of Ohioans have refused to be vaccinated, despite evidence that the injections are safe and effective.

“I’m not sure we’re going to change some people’s minds about vaccines,” Pamela Riggs, commissioner of the Sidney-Shelby County health department, told the Capital Journal.

Sidney-Shelby County is the third least vaccinated county in the state, according to the paper

‘I don’t know what else to say. It was just a very frustrating experience,” Riggs added.

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