Omid Scobie: Meghan Markle ‘may have been wrong to suggest Archie should be a prince’

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Meghan Markle ‘may have been wrong to suggest Archie should have been given the title of Prince’, admits Omid Scobie – but insists ‘there’s more to this story’

  • Meghan Markle ‘may have been wrong’ to suggest her son Archie should have been given the title of Prince, ‘her friend and biographer Omid Scobie suggested
  • In March, Meghan told Oprah that her son was not a prince due to a protocol change
  • In 1917, King George V issued a written order that only royal descendants in the direct line of succession could become princes and receive HRH titles.

Meghan Markle ‘may have been wrong’ to suggest that her son Archie should have been given the title of Prince, her boyfriend Omid Scobie has suggested.

In her bombshell Oprah interview in March, Meghan, 39, said her son was not made a prince due to a protocol change and implied the decision was made because of concerns about “ how dark his skin would be. ”

But in a new documentary Discovery +’s Harry and Meghan: Recollections May Vary, Meghan and Harry’s London-based biographer said that “ there’s more to it. ”

Taking only what Meghan said to Oprah and what the Palace has said so far about the situation with Archie, one can perhaps assume that Meghan was wrong in her interpretation of it. But we also know that there is much more to this story that we don’t know about, ”he said.

Meghan Markle `` may have been wrong '' to suggest that her son Archie should have been given the title of Prince, her boyfriend Omid Scobie has suggested.  Pictured during her interview in March

Meghan Markle ‘may have been wrong’ to suggest that her son Archie should have been given the title of Prince, her boyfriend Omid Scobie has suggested. Pictured during her interview in March

During the CBS interview in March, Meghan insisted she had no attachment to the “ greatness ” of official titles until she found out that Archie wouldn’t get his own security detail unless he was a prince.

Oprah said she had heard that it was Meghan and Harry who did not want Archie to receive a prince title, but the Duchess said this was not true and that it is ‘not our decision to make’.

Meghan said: ‘In those months that I was pregnant, all around the same time … so we simultaneously have the conversation of’ He’s not going to get certainty, he’s not going to be entitled ‘, as well as concerns and conversations about how dark his skin can be when he is born. ‘

The Duchess also said, “And so, I think even with that convention I’m talking about, while I was pregnant, they said they wanted to change the convention for Archie.”

In her bombshell Oprah interview in March, Meghan, 39, said her son was not made a prince due to a protocol change and implied the decision was made because of concerns about `` how dark his skin would be. ''  Meghan is pictured with Archie in South Africa in 2019

In her bombshell Oprah interview in March, Meghan, 39, said her son was not made a prince due to a protocol change and implied the decision was made because of concerns about `` how dark his skin would be. ''  Meghan is pictured with Archie in South Africa in 2019

In her bombshell Oprah interview in March, Meghan, 39, said her son was not made a prince due to a protocol change and implied the decision was made because of concerns about “ how dark his skin would be. ” Meghan is pictured with Archie in South Africa in 2019

However, Archie, who has no title and is called Mountbatten-Windsor by Archie, did not have a birthright to be a prince, due to a protocol held for over a century.

In 1917, King George V issued a written order that only royal descendants in the direct line of succession could become princes and receive HRH titles.

The Letters Patent read: ‘… the grandchildren of the sons of any such sovereign in the direct male line (except for the eldest living son of the eldest son of the Prince of Wales) will on all occasions have the style and title enjoyed by the children of dukes of these our realms. ‘

In a new documentary Discovery +'s Harry and Meghan: Recollections May Vary, Meghan and Harry's biographer Omid Scobie said: `` As long as we start from what Meghan said to Oprah and what the Palace has said so far about the situation with Archie, perhaps one can assume that Meghan was wrong in her interpretation of it.  '

In a new documentary Discovery + 's Harry and Meghan: Recollections May Vary, Meghan and Harry's biographer Omid Scobie said: can assume Meghan was wrong in her interpretation of it.  '

In a new documentary Discovery +’s Harry and Meghan: Recollections May Vary, Meghan and Harry’s biographer Omid Scobie said: “ As long as we start from what Meghan said to Oprah and what the Palace has said so far about the situation with Archie, perhaps one can assume that Meghan was wrong in her interpretation of it. ‘

Under the rules, only Prince William and the Duchess of Cambridge’s eldest son, Prince George – as the monarch’s great-grandson in the direct line of succession to the throne – originally had the right to be a prince.

The Queen stepped in before George’s birth in 2013 to issue a Letters Patent to ensure that all of George’s siblings – as the children of the future monarch William – would be given appropriate titles, meaning they were expanded to Charles and Louis.

Under the George V rules, Archie would have the right to be a HRH or a prince when his grandfather Charles, the Prince of Wales, takes the throne.

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