Advertisements
A lifelike model of a Homo predecessor female is formed to scoop out the brain of the headless head

A lifelike model of a Homo predecessor female is formed to scoop out the brain of the headless head

Advertisements

A lifelike model of a Homo predecessor female is formed to scoop out the brain of the headless head

Homo antecessor is one of the earliest known human varieties discovered in Europe, dating from a million years ago.

According to the assumption that it weighed around 14 stones, Homo antecessor was reportedly between 5.5 and 6ft in length.

Their brain dimensions were roughly between 1,000 and 1,150 cm³, which is smaller than the average brain of modern people of 1,350 cm³.

The species is thought to have been right-handed, making it different from other monkeys and possibly using a symbolic language, according to archaeologists who found remains in Burgos, Spain in 1994.

How Homo antecessor can be related to other Homo species in Europe has been the subject of fierce discussions.

Advertisements

Many anthropologists believe that there was an evolutionary link between Homo ergaster and Homo heidelbergensis.

Archaeologist Richard Klein claims that Homo antecessor was completely a separate species that evolved from Homo ergaster.

However, others claim that Homo Antecessor is in fact the same species as Homo Heidelbergensis, who lived in Europe in the Pleistocene between 600,000 and 250,000 years ago.

In 2010, stone tools were found at the same site in Happisburgh, Norfolk, presumably used by Homo antecessor.

Scientists believe that these early human species would breed on a regular basis.

Dr. Matthias Meyer, a paleogenetic at the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology, in Leipzig, Germany said: & # 39; The evolutionary history of archaic people in the Middle Pleistocene was quite complex.

& # 39. It may be that both the ancestors of the Sima people and Denisovans mixed with another archaic group such as Homo antecessor or Homo erectus.

Advertisements

& # 39; Or it is possible that the mitochondrial DNA that we know from late Neanderthals came from another group that left Africa. & # 39;

. [TagsToTranslate] Dailymail