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Ohio Zoo writes history with the world’s FIRST cheetah cubs born via IVF

Animal magic! Ohio Zoo makes history with the world’s FIRST cheetah cubs born via IVF using a surrogate in an effort to help save the declining species

  • Two cubs were born on February 19 by in vitro fertilization in Ohio
  • The team has inseminated a cheetah that is younger than the biological mother
  • Both would have genes that are valuable to help cheetahs survive
  • The eggs were fertilized with two males from different conservation facilities

Cheetahs are threatened with extinction, but experts have demonstrated a “scientific miracle” that could prevent this tragedy.

Two cheetah cubs were born by in vitro fertilization and embryo transfer into a surrogate mother at the Columbus Zoo and Aquarium.

The cubs, a female and a male, were delivered on February 19 by their biological mother Isabelle.

Cheetahs Kibibi, the biological mother and Isabella received hormone injections to stimulate follicle development and their eggs were fertilized with sperm originally collected from two men early last year.

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Cheetahs are threatened with extinction, but experts have demonstrated a “scientific miracle” that could prevent this tragedy. Two cheetah cubs were born by in vitro fertilization and embryo transfer into a gestational mother in the Columbus Zoo and Aquarium

This is the third attempt by scientists to produce and produce successful cubs.

Dr. Randy Junge, vice president of animal health at Columbus Zoo, said, “These two cubs may be small, but they represent a huge achievement, with expert biologists and zoologists working together to create this scientific miracle.”

“This achievement extends the scientific knowledge of cheetah reproduction and can become an important part of population management of the species in the future.”

The team noted that Kibbi, who is six and a half years old, and Isabella, who is nine years old, have genes that are valuable for maintaining a strong line of human care cheetahs.

The cubs, a female and a male, were delivered on February 19 by their biological mother Isabelle (photo)

The cubs, a female and a male, were delivered on February 19 by their biological mother Isabelle (photo)

The cubs, a female and a male, were delivered on February 19 by their biological mother Isabelle (photo)

Eggs from both females were extracted and fertilized in a Columbus Zoo laboratory using thawed sperm originally collected in February 2019 from two cheetahs: one male from Fossil Rim Wildlife Center and one from SCBI.

The embryos from the early stage of Kibibi were then implanted in Isabella.

And then, about a month later, an ultrasound revealed that two fetuses were growing within Isabella – the father of the cubs is the 3-year-old Slash of Fossil Rim Wildlife Center.

Jason Ahistus, Fossil Rim Carnivore Curator, said: “I am very proud of the team for this achievement.”

“It gives the cheetah community another tool to use in cheetah management, both in situ and ex situ.”

Eggs from both females were extracted and fertilized in a Columbus Zoo laboratory using thawed sperm originally collected in February 2019 from two cheetahs: one male from Fossil Rim Wildlife Center and another from SCBI

Eggs from both females were extracted and fertilized in a Columbus Zoo laboratory using thawed sperm originally collected in February 2019 from two cheetahs: one male from Fossil Rim Wildlife Center and another from SCBI

The cubs have yet to be mentioned, but one is male and the other is female

The cubs have yet to be mentioned, but one is male and the other is female

Eggs from both females were extracted and fertilized in a Columbus Zoo laboratory using thawed sperm originally collected in February 2019 from two cheetahs: one male from Fossil Rim Wildlife Center and one from SCBI. The baby cubs are depicted

The embryos from the early stage of Kibibi were then implanted in Isabella

The embryos from the early stage of Kibibi were then implanted in Isabella

The embryos from the early stage of Kibibi were then implanted in Isabella

About a month later, an ultrasound scan revealed that two fetuses were growing in Isabella

About a month later, an ultrasound scan revealed that two fetuses were growing in Isabella

About a month later, an ultrasound scan revealed that two fetuses were growing in Isabella

‘It really opens the door to many new opportunities that can help the global cheetah population. This is a big win for the cheetah. “

The International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN) classifies cheetahs as ‘Vulnerable’, with a declining population trend in their own Africa.

Threats such as loss of habitat and fragmentation, conflict with livestock and wild farmers, as well as unregulated tourism have left these animals with only 10 percent of their habitat.

Scientists estimate that the population has dropped to only around 7,500 and activists and experts are now asking for addition to the endangered list.

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