Obama White House tennis pro begs the FBI for financial help after they have seized his possessions

Obama White House tennis player begs the FBI for financial help because he claims he is BAD after they have captured $ 1 million of his belongings in college

  • Gordon Ernst, 52, says he needs funds that have been released to pay legal bills
  • Lawyers and prosecutors are said to have started negotiations on this subject
  • Ernst owns a $ 712,000 Falmouth apartment and $ 1.56 million D.C. house, reports say
  • But he says his assets & # 39; are considerably taxed by substantial debts & # 39;
  • The former tennis teacher at Georgetown University, who taught Michelle Obama and her daughters, pleaded not guilty in college bribery
  • He is accused of taking more than $ 2.7 million over six years to help 12 students

Gordon Ernst, former Georgetown tennis coach, leaves the federal court in Boston last month after filing charges with the national university. Admissions bribery scandal

Gordon Ernst, former Georgetown tennis coach, leaves the federal court in Boston last month after filing charges with the national university. Admissions bribery scandal

A tennis professional used by the Obama & # 39; s accused of accepting bribes from the college entrance exams, begged federal authorities for financial help after researchers seized $ 1 million of his assets.

Gordon Ernst, 52, was planning to request funds to be released to pay him legal bills of up to $ 250,000, a court that filed the unclosed Tuesday reported.

The former Georgetown University tennis coach, who also served as the White House of the Obama family's tennis pro, pleaded not guilty of conspiracy to obey last month.

Father-of-two Ernst, who was released on a $ 200,000 bond, would appear in court next week for Indira Talwani.

But the hearing was postponed until the end of this month because his lawyers and prosecutors would have started negotiations to resolve the issue.

He has a $ 712,000 apartment in Falmouth with his wife. The couple also has a $ 1.56 million home in Washington, D.C., reports The Boston Herald.

Ernst says that his assets & # 39; are significantly taxed by substantial debts & # 39; and & # 39; he has no access to funds from friends or family that are sufficient to cover his monthly living expenses or a constitutionally effective defense against the running costs & # 39 ;.

His lawyers say the $ 1,563 million seized by the FBI was part of & # 39; legitimately earned wages & # 39 ;. Documents from the court show that it was taken from four banks, brokerage and IRA accounts.

And his lawyers say he now has no income after leaving a position at the University of Rhode Island.

They say: & even if it is assumed that Mr. Ernst could sell his house in Maryland (he cannot sell his apartment building in Massachusetts in light of the restraining order), his sale will not yield any revenue, excluding costs and commissions , sufficient for his legal defense. & # 39;

The former tennis employee of Georgetown University left in 2017 after an internal investigation revealed that he violated the admission rules

The former tennis employee of Georgetown University left in 2017 after an internal investigation revealed that he violated the admission rules

The former tennis employee of Georgetown University left in 2017 after an internal investigation revealed that he violated the admission rules

Ernst was the personal tennis coach for the former first lady Michelle Obama and her daughters

Ernst was the personal tennis coach for the former first lady Michelle Obama and her daughters

Ernst was the personal tennis coach for the former first lady Michelle Obama and her daughters

The tennis pro, arrested on March 12, is accused of taking more than $ 2.7 million in six years to help 12 students become Georgetown University as tennis players.

Ernst, who was also the personal tennis coach for former first lady Michelle Obama and her daughters, left Georgetown in 2017 after an internal investigation revealed that he violated the admission rules.

He is faced with up to 20 years in federal prison if he is convicted.

High profile parents, athletic coaches and others have been accused of the radical admission to the university bribery scam that has involved elite schools across the country.

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