NZ government supports movement and claims exclusive rights to & # 39; manuka & # 39; honey – it costs Australia $ 1 billion

That will poke! New Zealand is taking a daring step to claim manuka honey as their own – and it can cost Australian beekeepers $ 1 BILLION

  • The New Zealand government has decided to support its local honey producers
  • Local beekeepers in China try the term & # 39; manuka honey & # 39; to trademark
  • Australian honey producers say the term & # 39; manuka & # 39; is not exclusive to NZ
  • The term is used in New Zealand and Tasmania and the south of Victoria in Australia
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New Zealand has claimed that it has the rights to the name & # 39; manuka-honey & # 39; possession – and it could cost Australian farmers as much as $ 1 billion if they can no longer sell their products in the same way.

The New Zealand government has written a letter of support for a group of honey producers known as the Manuka Honey Appellation Society in its fight for the word & # 39; manuka & # 39; can be used exclusively on country honey products.

The MHAS calls on the Beijing Intellectual Property Court to have the right to be the only producers who can use the word.

If they are successful, Australian honey producers will use the word & # 39; manuka & # 39; can no longer use it to sell their products on the lucrative Chinese market where honey sells up to $ 400 per kilogram.

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New Zealand has claimed that it has the rights to the name & # 39; manuka-honey & # 39; possession - and it could cost Australian farmers as much as $ 1 billion if they can no longer market their products in the same way (stock image)

New Zealand has claimed that it has the rights to the name & # 39; manuka-honey & # 39; possession – and it could cost Australian farmers as much as $ 1 billion if they can no longer market their products in the same way (stock image)

The Australian government has refused to intervene in the same way, but Agriculture Minister Bridget McKenzie is looking for clarification & # 39; of their counterparts in New Zealand, the Sydney Morning Herald reported.

Manuka honey is considered in China as & # 39; liquid gold & # 39; and is used by people who want to slow the aging process, repair damaged skin and cure coughs and colds.

The honey comes from Leptospermum scoparium trees that grow in New Zealand, Tasmania and Victoria.

Sun Brooks chemist Peter Brooks said that despite the struggle for the trademark, it was incorrect that manuka honey was only produced in New Zealand.

& # 39; New Zealand, with support from their government, has a deeper wallet than we do and they are currently winning the international battle, & # 39; said Dr. Brooks.

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He believes that New Zealand will have a monopoly on the Chinese honey market if it excludes its products exclusively as & # 39; manuka & # 39; on the market.

The Australian chairman of the Manuka Honey Association, Paul Callander, said it was crucial that the Australian government get involved in the & # 39; major trade problem & # 39 ;.

Last year the New Zealand MHAS was able to get a trademark certification for the term & # 39; manuka & # 39; in the UK – but that decision is challenged by Australian beekeepers.

A similar application from the MHAS was rejected by the US Intellectual Property Office.

The New Zealand government has written a letter of support for a group of honey producers known as the Manuka Honey Appellation Society in its fight for the word & # 39; manuka & # 39; can be used exclusively on country honey products

The New Zealand government has written a letter of support for a group of honey producers known as the Manuka Honey Appellation Society in its fight for the word & # 39; manuka & # 39; can be used exclusively on country honey products

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The New Zealand government has written a letter of support for a group of honey producers known as the Manuka Honey Appellation Society in its fight for the word & # 39; manuka & # 39; can be used exclusively on country honey products

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