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NYC metal thief thanks Democrats for controversial bail reform after its 139th JUDGMENT

A serial thief who has made nearly 140 arrests in New York City for dropping unsuspecting subway commuters says the Democrats owe it because bail reform has allowed him to commit more crimes.

“I’m famous!” Said Charles Barry, 56 years old New York Daily News reporter outside the Manhattan criminal court on Saturday after he was read.

“I take $ 200, $ 300 a day out of your money, cracker! You can’t stop me! “

When the police led Barry out of a district on Thursday after his last arrest, he called to a reporter: “Bail reform, it’s enlightened!”

“They are the democrats! The Democrats know me and the Republicans fear me.

“You can’t touch me! I can’t be stopped! “

Barry has been arrested six times so far in 2020 – each time he was released without bail thanks to a new state law that came into force on January 1.

Charles Barry, 56, is a serial thief who has been arrested 139 times by the New York police. He has served six stints in the state prison for non-violent crimes such as the sale of drugs and larceny

Charles Barry, 56, is a serial thief who has been arrested 139 times by the New York police. He has served six stints in the state prison for non-violent crimes such as the sale of drugs and larceny

On two occasions he was arrested for stealing money from metro commuters who were buying Metrocards from the vending machines at the metro station.

On January 19, Barry reportedly stole $ 50 from a woman’s hand at West 42nd Street and Sixth Avenue subway stations near Manhattan’s Bryant Park.

He was then given a ticket for the look of a desk because he had not shown up for a court hearing.

The 2020 arrests come on top of the 134 other arrests for crimes such as grand larceny, petty larceny and fraudulent indictment, according to the New York Daily News.

The new law in New York State, passed after Democrats took control of the Albany legislator, requires judges to release those accused of crimes and non-violent crimes.

To ensure that those arrested return for their judicial dates, the court may impose non-monetary conditions, such as electronic supervision or release under supervision.

If someone is suspected of committing a violent crime and the judge is not convinced that he or she will appear before the date of his trial, the judge can impose bail.

Proponents of the reform say it is necessary to reduce the population in prison before the trial and to fight mass imprisonment.

Opponents say that repeat offenders can continue to use crime without a deterrent.

Since Barry’s crimes are considered nonviolent, judges are not allowed to send him to prison while his case is awaiting trial.

According to the authorities, Barry has a history of stalking commuters and stealing their wallets.

Police say he even pretended to be a staff member of the Metropolitan Transportation Authority and offered assistance to drivers who bought subway tickets just to run away with their cash and credit cards.

56-year-old Barry has served six terms in prison, according to the Daily News.

He was convicted after being convicted of selling drugs and on a large scale.

Police say Barry has mimicked an MTA employee and approached commuters who offer them to buy Metrocards from vending machines (as seen above at 14th Street-Union Square station in Manhattan) - only to run away with their money

Police say Barry has mimicked an MTA employee and approached commuters who offer them to buy Metrocards from vending machines (as seen above at 14th Street-Union Square station in Manhattan) - only to run away with their money

Police say Barry has mimicked an MTA employee and approached commuters who offer them to buy Metrocards from vending machines (as seen above at 14th Street-Union Square station in Manhattan) – only to run away with their money

A transit police officer says the new bail reform law is guilty of Barry’s crimes.

“At least before that, he would be sent back and spend a few days behind bars. He couldn’t make people a victim, “said Assistant Chief Gerald Dieckmann, the second officer of the NYPD Transit Bureau.

Critics of the bail law say that it must be adjusted so that judges have some freedom to impose bail on potentially dangerous suspects.

But supporters of the bail law accuse the NYPD of reinforcing Barry’s arrests to promote their agenda.

“We strongly oppose any change to the bail law as it is written,” said the Legal Aid Society.

The LAS, representing Barry, says it is not good for him to put him in prison.

“Mr. The Barry case underscores the need for economic stability and meaningful social services, not a need to reverse bail reform, “the Society said in a statement.

“Locking up Barry for priceless bail or worse, withdrawing without bail, ultimately does nothing to protect the public and completely fails in his real needs.”

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