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Nursing home that MP Nadia Whittome fired for expressing fears about PPE admits it was short

Nursing home bosses who fired a Member of Parliament for criticizing the shortage of personal protective equipment (PPE) have admitted that she was right all along.

Nadia Whittome, Labour’s representative for Nottingham East, was fired from her part-time job at Lark Hill Retirement Village in May after revealing that masks at home were limited to one day and said it was putting the lives of residents and carers at risk.

ExtraCare, which runs the house, accused her of “spreading misinformation” and causing panic among elderly residents. It said the claims of PPE shortages were “inaccurate” and they had “more than three months” of inventory.

A spokesperson also alleged that her employment had been terminated because their own staff had become ‘sufficient’ to cover her services.

But the MP and her employer have since left their disagreements behind, with ExtraCare admitting that it was in fact struggling with “ supply chain issues ” at the time.

The 23-year-old politician said she had raised awareness of the circumstances as it was her “duty to be honest about the lack of personal protective equipment and testing.”

When the Covid-19 crisis started, she had taken the job in the nursing home where she used to work because she wanted to help.

ExtraCare CEO Mick Laverty welcomed Ms. Whittome back into her role and stated that her actions had been taken in ‘good faith’ and with the ‘best interest of all concerned’.

Nadia Whittome, Labor MP for Nottingham East (photo in Parliament) has been sued by Lark Hill Retirement Village four months after she was fired from the care home

Nadia Whittome, Labor MP for Nottingham East (photo in Parliament) has been sued by Lark Hill Retirement Village four months after she was fired from the care home

Ms. Whittone said she was “appalled” when her contract in the nursing home was terminated

“In partnership with Nadia, we have made a number of calls for additional support in the supply of PPE, enabling us to obtain further supplies,” said Mr. Laverty.

For example, in March 2020, we made several online requests for PPE via social media and asked Nadia to consider recording a PPE call-up video on April 3, 2020 to help us with further supplies.

“We really appreciated her raising these issues, which has helped highlight the issue of the PPE supply chain, both within Lark Hill and the healthcare industry.

“Nadia’s work and support during the engagement was a great help to ExtraCare and our residents.

“While we have quite different views on why the role ended, Nadia and ExtraCare have discussed this matter further and then agreed to resolve all matters amicably and informally so that everyone can move on.”

ExtraCare, which runs the house, accused her of 'spreading misinformation' and panic among residents after raising concerns about chronic lack of PPE

ExtraCare, which runs the house, accused her of 'spreading misinformation' and panic among residents after raising concerns about chronic lack of PPE

ExtraCare, which runs the house, accused her of ‘spreading misinformation’ and panic among residents after raising concerns about chronic lack of PPE

She raised concerns about PPE deliveries in the media and through her own social media

She raised concerns about PPE deliveries in the media and through her own social media

She raised concerns about PPE deliveries in the media and through her own social media

Ms. Whittone said she was “glad” she resolved this with the care home.

“I wanted to do what I could to support the residents of Lark Hill and support my colleagues in the healthcare sector, locally and nationally,” she said.

‘I enjoyed helping my former colleagues during the Covid-19 outbreak, albeit at a very challenging time for healthcare.

COVID-19 ‘HAS ONE IN EVERY 16 RESIDENTS OF CARE HOUSES’

According to research, the coronavirus has reportedly killed one in 16 residents of nursing homes in England and Wales.

Data shows that there have been 26,211 more deaths in care homes since the outbreak began, compared to the five-year average for the same time period.

While the coronavirus is believed to be the main driver of the rise in deaths, the massive disruptions to normal care home services as a result of the pandemic are also believed to have killed people.

Figures released today by the Office for National Statistics (ONS) show that 11,614 deaths are related to the coronavirus, while the other half are due to other reasons.

Much of the excess mortality rates are due to dementia or related illness, although many retirement home residents in these situations experienced serious difficulties due to a lack of contact with known loved ones as lockdown regulations tightened.

There are 411,000 people living in care homes in England and Wales, and the data shows that more than six percent – or one in 16 – have died since the spring.

‘I am pleased that my contribution is recognized and appreciated, also with regard to the various PPE issues in healthcare.’

Ms. Whittone served the trust for two months as a personal support service until May this year.

She had raised concerns about the supply of PPE in nursing homes to various news outlets, newspapers and websites, and reported on the crisis on social media.

Their decision to end her contract left her ‘shocked’, with an employee in the house saying they were ‘stunned’ at the decision to remove an ‘excellent caring worker’ who ‘said nothing but facts’.

Officials have since admitted that care homes were an ‘afterthought’ at the height of the crisis, with 25,000 patients discharged from hospitals between March 17 and April 15.

The National Audit Office (NAO) said in its June report – the first independent evaluation of preparations for the pandemic – that homes had been overlooked to protect the NHS.

It also revealed that plans to distribute PPE were hampered because in 2019 officials ignored the warning to stock coats and visors – and didn’t have enough of them when needed.

As a result, less than half of the necessary equipment was available to health workers on the front lines of the crisis.

So far, at least 300 health workers have died from the coronavirus, and survivors and health unions say a lack of personal protective equipment is partly to blame.

They also accounted for 29 percent of the total coronavirus deaths, 13,460 out of 45,748, on May 29.

The high levels are believed to be due to a lack of personal protective equipment, but also that it is more difficult to control the virus in a care home, as many residents cannot live independently and therefore require close contact with workers.

Cases are also thought to be more difficult to detect, as residents are often sick with other conditions with similar symptoms and may not show typical symptoms of Covid-19.

The government’s policy for testing in nursing homes, during the peak of the outbreak, was to test a small sample at home and, if positive cases were found, assume there was an outbreak in the home and automatically other people with similar symptoms. as coronavirus patients.

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