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Asthma UK and the Royal College of Nursing have called for an urgent policy review, described as & # 39; outdated & # 39; and & # 39; unfair & # 39;

NHS reception fees of £ 9 for asthma patients in England lead to scores of poor patients at risk of fatal attacks & # 39; by forcing them to pay to breathe & # 39;

  • Asthma UK and the Royal College of Nursing have called for an urgent review
  • Recipes are free for all patients in Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland
  • But they cost £ 9 each time for most of the 4.5 million patients living in England
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NHS costs for asthma patients in England leave dozens of patients at risk of fatal attacks, reports a report.

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Asthma UK and the Royal College of Nursing have called for an urgent policy review, described as & # 39; outdated & # 39; and & # 39; unfair & # 39 ;.

Recipes are free for all patients who live in Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland – but they cost £ 9 at a time in England.

Patients with a number of long-term disorders such as diabetes and epilepsy are entitled to medical exemption certificates. But no asthma patients.

Figures estimate about half of the 4.5 million asthma patients in England have to pay for their prescriptions, which can cost up to £ 400 a year.

Asthma UK and the Royal College of Nursing have called for an urgent policy review, described as & # 39; outdated & # 39; and & # 39; unfair & # 39;

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Asthma UK and the Royal College of Nursing have called for an urgent policy review, described as & # 39; outdated & # 39; and & # 39; unfair & # 39;

Samantha Walker, director of research and policy at Asthma UK and a qualified nurse, said it's time for the government to take action.

She said & # 39; no one should pay to breathe & # 39 ;. The cost of prescriptions in England increased by 20 p in April after a price increase by officials.

Wendy Preston, head of nursing practice at the Royal College of Nursing, warned about the risks of patients not taking their prescribed medication.

She said: & # 39; It may not be acceptable that some people with long-term illnesses miss their vital medication because they cannot afford it.

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& # 39; Nurses see the impact of this every day of the week and know what happens when people don't take their vital medication.

& # 39; This will only make their condition worse and they will eventually need further treatment, which will put additional pressure on the health and care system.

& # 39; It is time that there is equality with other long-term conditions such as diabetes, for which prescription costs are exempt. & # 39;

WHAT IS ASTMA?

Asthma is a common but incurable condition that affects the small tubes in the lungs.

It can cause them to become inflamed or swell, which limits the airways and makes it harder to breathe.

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The condition affects people of all ages and often starts in childhood. Symptoms may improve or even disappear as children get older, but may return to adulthood.

Symptoms include wheezing, shortness of breath, tight chest and cough, and these can get worse during an asthma attack.

Treatment usually includes medication that is inhaled to calm the lungs.

Triggers for the condition are allergies, dust, air pollution, exercise and infections such as the cold or flu.

If you think you or your child have asthma, you should visit a doctor, as this can develop into more serious complications such as fatigue or lung infections.

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Source: NHS

The report also concerned the Association of Respiratory Nurse Specialists. About 750 doctors were interviewed, including 600 nurses.

Ninety-two percent of the nurses surveyed said they wanted & # 39; harmful & # 39; prescription costs for patients with asthma were discarded.

Some nurses told how patients borrowed inhalers from friends, family members and even their own children because they could not afford them.

A caregiver even admitted that she had paid for her patient's asthma prescription because she feared they could not afford it.

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Many asthma patients use brown prevention actors to reduce their risk of a flare-up and wear a blue inhaler in case they have difficulty breathing.

The list of medical exemptions was made more than 50 years ago, when asthma knowledge was very poor and few treatments were available.

Some patients in England can get free prescriptions if they are under 16, over 60, in full-time education, pregnant or have a new mother, or receive benefits.

About 70,000 people have signed the petition so far to stop prescribing asthma in England.

Previous research by Asthma UK showed that three-quarters of patients had difficulty paying for their prescriptions.

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This corresponds to an estimated 1.3 million people with asthma in England who do not take their medication regularly due to the costs.

The UK mortality rate from asthma has risen by 20 percent over the past five years and is, according to analysis, one of the worst in Europe.

Asthma is a common but incurable condition that affects the small tubes in the lungs.

It can cause them to become inflamed or swell, which limits the airways and makes it harder to breathe.

The condition affects people of all ages and often starts in childhood. Symptoms may improve or even disappear as children get older, but may return to adulthood.

& # 39; SOME MY PATIENTS SHOULD Borrow A CHILD FROM THEIR CHILD & # 39;

Bonnie Beard, who works in two general practices in Essex, claimed that some patients have to wait until they get paid before receiving their medication
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Bonnie Beard, who works in two general practices in Essex, claimed that some patients have to wait until they get paid before receiving their medication

Bonnie Beard, who works in two general practices in Essex, claimed that some patients have to wait until they get paid before receiving their medication

A respiratory nurse who has been treating patients for 30 years has told how some of her patients should borrow an inhaler from their children.

Bonnie Beard, who works in two GP practices in Essex, claimed that some patients have to wait until they get paid before receiving their medication.

She said: & # 39; I know firsthand that the cost of asthma prescriptions can be harmful to patients.

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& # 39; It can happen that they control their asthma and in some cases it can endanger lives. & # 39;

Mrs. Beard added that some patients & # 39; borrow the inhaler from their child or an inhaler from a family member or friend & # 39 ;.

This means & # 39; they are taking medications that may not be suitable for them & she added. & # 39; This may put them at risk for poorly controlled asthma. & # 39;

& # 39; Most weeks I speak with patients who have worsened asthma or who have had asthma attacks. & # 39;

Mrs Beard, who sees about 20 asthma patients every week, says that some people need emergency help because they have been unable to afford to take the medicines that keep them well.

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& # 39; I want the best for my patients, so it is frustrating that some of them become unwell because they cannot afford to pay for their prescriptions, & # 39; she added.

& # 39; It seems unfair that they have to pay when people with other long-term life-threatening conditions such as diabetes are exempt. & # 39;

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