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Nurse writes letter to WIRES for holding $ 53 million for animals injured in Australian forest fires

“The world has made a huge mistake … animals are dying”: furious nurse calls WIRES boss for releasing only $ 7 million of the donated $ 60 million – and keeping the rest for “research”

  • Registered nurse accuses WIRES of withholding $ 53 million in donations
  • WIRES spent $ 7 million on health care providers who need help from forest fires
  • Sarah Hart wants all the money to be given to carers who actively help

A registered nurse has accused WIRES, the wildlife conservation organization, of withholding over $ 50 million in donations to help native animals recover from the devastating forest fires in Australia.

Sarah Hart met Leanne Taylor last Tuesday with the intention of discussing animal welfare and making a donation.

She discovered that WIRES had only distributed $ 7 million of the $ 60 million in donations they received to help caretakers and animals affected during the nation’s most extensive forest fires.

“The world has made a huge mistake by entrusting $ 60 million to your organization,” she concluded in an open letter that was later posted on Facebook.

But WIRES told Daily Mail Australia that they strongly refute the claims, and do everything to distribute the money effectively.

Injured koalas are being treated by veterinarians and volunteers at Kangaroo Island Wildlife Park after the fire broke out in early January

Injured koalas are being treated by veterinarians and volunteers at Kangaroo Island Wildlife Park after the fire broke out in early January

An orphan kangaroo and Wallaby Joey's cart is seen at the Australia Zoo Wildlife Hospital in Beerwah, Queensland on January 15

An orphan kangaroo and Wallaby Joey's cart is seen at the Australia Zoo Wildlife Hospital in Beerwah, Queensland on January 15

An orphan kangaroo and Wallaby Joey’s cart is seen at the Australia Zoo Wildlife Hospital in Beerwah, Queensland on January 15

“Animals are in critical care or starving in the barren wilderness … The expectations don’t seem to be met,” Hart wrote.

She said she spoke to every donor who had contributed to the fund in recent months by saying that the money was meant to go directly into the field to help care for animals.

She started her own fundraising, The Gift Collective, where people can buy a small item with all the profit going to the purchase of much needed equipment for animal care providers in Australia.

Ms. Taylor said that WIRES was still working out how to distribute the funds in the most effective way.

“It’s a great gift and it comes with a huge responsibility and we absolutely must deliver now that we’ve received this funding throughout the industry at the national level,” she said.

A dead Koala is seen after forest fires on Kangaroo Island, southwest of Adelaide, were swept on Tuesday January 7, destroying most of the habitat

A dead Koala is seen after forest fires on Kangaroo Island, southwest of Adelaide, were swept on Tuesday January 7, destroying most of the habitat

A dead Koala is seen after forest fires on Kangaroo Island, southwest of Adelaide, were swept on Tuesday, January 7, destroying most of the habitat

Horses panic and try to escape while a fire runs through a home near Canberra on 1 February 2020

Horses panic and try to escape while a fire runs through a house near Canberra on 1 February 2020

Horses panic and try to escape while a fire runs through a home near Canberra on 1 February 2020

WIRES Mid-South Coast Bat coordinator Janet Jones holds a rescued Gray-Headed Flying-Fox at her home after his habitat was destroyed in forest fires

WIRES Mid-South Coast Bat coordinator Janet Jones holds a rescued Gray-Headed Flying-Fox at her home after his habitat was destroyed in forest fires

WIRES Mid-South Coast Bat coordinator Janet Jones holds a rescued Gray-Headed Flying-Fox at her home after his habitat was destroyed in forest fires

Ms. Taylor said that the organization has taken into account the animals that are yet to arrive in the care, and said that the effects of the forest fires – which are largely under control – will be felt well in the future.

‘Many of the animals, I think, will come from secondary things as a result of the fires, so around loss of habitat and drought, loss of food. It therefore becomes a long-term program to help caregivers. “

HOW MS THREAD THINKS MUST PAY THE DONATIONS

1. Immediate release of all funds donated by the global community as intended.

2. Reimbursement of all costs incurred plus continuous coverage of all costs as a result of veterinary treatment or consultation.

3. Continuous delivery of all foods of every kind for all caregivers, so that no caregiver is out of his pocket, not at all, period.

4. Feed and water stations set up throughout the country to feed our hungry animals.

WIRES have pledged an additional $ 25 million to meet the long-term care of animals and funding projects that address the effects of the changed environmental landscape.

Another $ 25 million goes into involving volunteers in saving and rehabilitating wildlife affected by bushfire, drought and extreme weather when the time comes.

But Mrs. Hart wrote in the open letter that she thought the organization had a long list of apologies for keeping $ 53 million in the bank.

“I’m surprised you can’t hear the roar of dissatisfaction and suffering that has been building up over the past 6 weeks,” she wrote.

“It is imperative that you release money immediately to enable nature care workers to do what they are committed to.”

Some caregivers who worked tirelessly for months to save animals simply gave up, Hart said.

In response to Ms. Taylor’s argument that research was important, Ms. Hart said “no amount of research will help these famished creatures unless we act immediately to save them.”

A dead kangaroo Joey can be seen on the edge of the Playford Highway west of Parndana on January 10, 2020 on Kangaroo Island

A dead kangaroo Joey can be seen on the edge of the Playford Highway west of Parndana on January 10, 2020 on Kangaroo Island

A dead kangaroo Joey can be seen on the edge of the Playford Highway west of Parndana on January 10, 2020 on Kangaroo Island

WIRES caretaker Julie Mills gives bottle feeding to an orphaned-rescued Eastern Gray Kangaroo Joey after forest fires have decimated his home

WIRES caretaker Julie Mills gives bottle feeding to an orphaned-rescued Eastern Gray Kangaroo Joey after forest fires have decimated his home

WIRES caretaker Julie Mills gives bottle feeding to an orphan bag rescued Eastern Gray Kangaroo Joey after forest fires have decimated his home

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