Nurse Tries To Prove Vaccines MAKE People To Ohio Legislature By Sticking A Key In Her Neck

0

An Ohio anti-vaccine nurse tried to prove that Covid vaccinations make people magnetic by sticking a key to her body, but it fell off.

Joanna Overholt testified before the Ohio House Health Committee on Wednesday about the perceived dangers of the inoculations.

dr. Sherri Tenpenny, an osteopathic physician, had previously testified about “magnetic vaccine crystals,” and Ms. Overholt tried to prove her theory with a wrench and bobby pin.

She sticks a key to her chest and proudly says, “Explain to me why the key sticks to me.”

Mrs. Overholt then tries to stick it around her neck, but it keeps falling down as soon as she takes her hand away.

After struggling to put the key in her neck, she says, “Yeah, so if someone could explain this, that would be great. Any questions?’

An Ohio anti-vaccine nurse tried to prove that Covid vaccinations make people magnetic by sticking a key to her body, but it fell off.

An Ohio anti-vaccine nurse tried to prove that Covid vaccinations make people magnetic by sticking a key to her body, but it fell off.

Joanna Overholt testified before the Ohio House Health Committee on Wednesday about the perceived dangers of the inoculations

Joanna Overholt testified before the Ohio House Health Committee on Wednesday about the perceived dangers of the inoculations

It’s not clear why the antivaxx Ms. Overholt tested her wild claims on her own body, specifically using a key likely made of brass, which isn’t magnetic.

dr. Tenpenny had previously made the bizarre magnetic claims after watching viral internet videos that claimed to show vaccinated people sticking keys, forks and spoons to their bodies.

“They put a key on their forehead and it sticks, they can put spoons and forks over them and they can stick because now we think there’s a metal piece to it,” the doctor said on the floor of the house.

It's not clear why the antivaxx Ms. Overholt tested her wild claims on her own body, specifically using a key likely made of brass, which isn't magnetic.

It’s not clear why the antivaxx Ms. Overholt tested her wild claims on her own body, specifically using a key likely made of brass, which isn’t magnetic.

Speaking at an Ohio State Health Committee meeting Tuesday, Sherri Tenpenny claimed the Covid-19 vaccine is magnetizing people

Speaking at an Ohio State Health Committee meeting Tuesday, Sherri Tenpenny claimed the Covid-19 vaccine is magnetizing people

She went further by linking her claims with another theory about the vaccines containing microchips that use 5G technology.

“There have been people who have long suspected that there was some sort of interface, yet to be defined, an interface between what is injected into these shots and all the 5G towers,” she said.

Tenpenny spoke in favor of Ohio State House Bill 248, called the Vaccine Choice and Anti-Discrimination Act, which would ban mandatory vaccinations in Ohio and prohibit schools and businesses from requiring attendees to be vaccinated.

Sherri Tenpenny based her theory on viral Internet videos in which vaccinated people stick keys, forks and spoons to their bodies.  This clip shows a woman claiming to be vaccinated with a quarter sticking to her arm.  She claims, instead of simple glue, it's because she's 'magnetized'

Sherri Tenpenny based her theory on viral Internet videos in which vaccinated people stick keys, forks and spoons to their bodies. This clip shows a woman claiming to be vaccinated with a quarter sticking to her arm. She claims, instead of simple glue, it’s because she’s ‘magnetized’

One of the videos Tenpenny mentioned was flagged as 'false' on Facebook

One of the videos Tenpenny mentioned was flagged as ‘false’ on Facebook

Twitter users were quick to joke about her statements when StarDustArt1 wrote, “WOW! No words… Strange, I can’t stick to my keys or a fork anywhere and I’m fully vaccinated. Curious when this starts?’

Another Twitter user, DeeDee SMITH, wrote, “That could be helpful. Never lose your keys again, just stick them on your forehead. Thanks Bill Gates!!’

And Twitter user Tommy wrote, “So what she’s saying is ppl turns into Magneto,” referring to the magnetized X-Men comic character.

The anti-vaxx claims about the COVID-19 have been thoroughly debunked since they first surfaced last year.

Professor Michael Coey of the School of Physics at Trinity College Dublin called the claims “complete nonsense” and said that one would need a gram of iron metal to attract and support a permanent magnet at the injection site, “something you ‘would feel easy’ if it was there.’

Sherri Tenpenny, an osteopathic physician from Cleveland, Ohio, has long been an outspoken anti-vaxxer

Sherri Tenpenny, an osteopathic physician from Cleveland, Ohio, has long been an outspoken anti-vaxxer

Tenpenny has long touted a number of other claims about vaccinations, including claims that they cause autism, on her own talk show The Tenpenny Files Podcast. She was also a guest at a number of outlets, most notably the Dr. Oz Show and the Today Show Australia.

The site’s home page describes Tenpenny as “Widely regarded as the most knowledgeable and outspoken physician on the adverse health effects vaccines can have.”

Tenpenny works at the Tenpenny Integrative Medical Center in Cleveland, Ohio, which she founded in 1996, and treats patients with a combination of conventional and holistic therapies.

She also offers a $595 eight-week course in anti-vaccination points, despite a federal judge finding her “unqualified” to serve as an expert witness in a vaccine-related lawsuit.

Fact Check: Do Vaccines Really Magnet You?

Vaccines for COVID-19 do not contain metals or microchips that make the recipient magnetic at the injection site, physicists and medical experts have told Reuters.

The flawed claim was made in a series of viral videos that claimed to show magnets attracted to the arms of alleged recipients of the jab. Several clips said the alleged phenomenon was proof that people had been chipped, while others offered no explanation for the magnet challenge. Only one video mentioned a specific vaccine and claimed that the person on camera had received the Pfizer/BioNTech recording.

However, these reports are not evidence of a magnetic response, nor that COVID-19 shots contain a microchip.

First, during the pandemic, Reuters has debunked baseless conspiracies about microchips in coronavirus vaccines, often targeting Microsoft co-founder and philanthropist Bill Gates.

Second, none of the UK or US approved COVID-19 shots contain any metallic ingredients. Many other shots contain small amounts of aluminum, but researchers at the University of Oxford say this is no more harmful than the minimal amounts naturally found in almost all foods and drinking water.

Vaccines for COVID-19 do not contain metals or microchips that make the recipient magnetic at the injection site, physicists and medical experts have told Reuters.  Kent State University student Regan Raeth, (right), of Hudson, Ohio, gets vaccinated on April 8

Vaccines for COVID-19 do not contain metals or microchips that make the recipient magnetic at the injection site, physicists and medical experts have told Reuters. Kent State University student Regan Raeth, (right), of Hudson, Ohio, gets vaccinated on April 8

Third, even if COVID-19 vaccines contained metals, they would not cause a magnetic reaction. Medical professionals at the Meedan Health Desk said, “The amount of metal that must be in a vaccine to attract a magnet is far greater than the amounts that can be present in a small dose of a vaccine.”

They added that humans are all naturally “a little magnetic” because we contain small amounts of iron. However, the combination of iron and water in the body repels magnets very slightly, and this feature is the basis of Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) scans that allow doctors to assess your organs in hospitals.

Professor Michael Coey of the School of Physics at Trinity College Dublin also described the claims as “complete nonsense” and told Reuters via email that you would need about one gram of iron metal to attract a permanent magnet to the injection site. and support, something you would ‘feel easy’ if it were there.

By the way, my wife got her second dose of the Pfizer vaccine today and I got mine over two weeks ago. I checked that magnets aren’t attracted to our arms!” he wrote.

Responding to a “magnet challenge” video specifically claiming to contain a recipient of a Pfizer shot, a company spokeswoman confirmed in an email to Reuters that their vaccine contains no metals and cannot cause a magnetic reaction when it is used. is injected.

JUDGMENT: False. Experts say that vaccinated individuals cannot experience magnetism at the injection site.

Thanks to Reuters

.