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Susan O & # 39; Hara, from Tumbi Umbi in the semi-rural suburb of the central coast of New South Wales, found the & # 39; bloody huge intruder & # 39; who admired a vase of flowers

& # 39; It looks like we're sleeping in the garage & # 39 ;: terrifying moment when a nurse discovers a huge python sliding on her kitchen bench

  • Susan O & # 39; Hara found the & # 39; bloody huge intruder who admired a vase of flowers
  • The mother, her daughter, cat and two dogs kept their distance from the snake
  • Mrs. O & # 39; Hara, who has a snake phobia, says this was the first she had seen in six years
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A nurse with a snake phobia is forced to face her fear after being confronted with a huge diamond python in her kitchen.

Susan O & # 39; Hara, from Tumbi Umbi on the NSW Central Coast, saw the & # 39; bloody huge intruder & # 39; admire a vase of flowers.

The mother said she was trying to keep her daughter, cat and two dogs away while she shouted: & # 39; Get out of my house! & # 39;

& # 39; That's what I was yelling at it from a distance of 1 km, & # 39; she said.

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Susan O & # 39; Hara, from Tumbi Umbi in the semi-rural suburb of the central coast of New South Wales, found the & # 39; bloody huge intruder & # 39; who admired a vase of flowers

Susan O & # 39; Hara, from Tumbi Umbi in the semi-rural suburb of the central coast of New South Wales, found the & # 39; bloody huge intruder & # 39; who admired a vase of flowers

Mrs. O & # 39; Hara, who is on a & # 39; grassy & # 39; lives on three hectares, suspects that the snake came from dense bushland behind her house.

She said it was & # 39; curious & # 39; reptile may have entered through the open back door.

& # 39; Six years ago and it is the first snake we have seen. A bit rude inviting himself without an invitation! & # 39; she said.

She said the dogs kept barking at the python but their distance remained for fear.

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After giving herself time to calm down, Mrs. O & Hara realized that the snake seemed harmless.

& # 39; I just didn't want to share my house, & # 39; she said.

& # 39; It looks like we're all sleeping in the garage – much safer with the lawn mower and spiders.

& # 39; He [the snake] was properly arranged and did not go anywhere. & # 39;

Mrs. O & # 39; Hara & # 39; s brave cousin and husband came to the rescue and grabbed the python by the tail before releasing it into the bush.

Mrs. O & # 39; Hara, who is on a & # 39; grassy & # 39; lives on three hectares, suspects that the snake came from dense bushland behind her house
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Mrs. O & # 39; Hara, who is on a & # 39; grassy & # 39; lives on three hectares, suspects that the snake came from dense bushland behind her house

Mrs. O & # 39; Hara, who is on a & # 39; grassy & # 39; lives on three hectares, suspects that the snake came from dense bushland behind her house

Diamond pythons are non-toxic snakes with a distinctive pattern of a black background with cream or yellow spots and stains.

The species is found in the coastal areas of New South Wales and can reach two to three meters in length.

Stuart Mckenzie out Sunshine Coast Snake Catchers 24/7 told Daily Mail Australia that the python was most likely & # 39; looking for food & # 39; and & # 39; was looking for a cooler place & # 39 ;.

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& # 39; They are not dangerous. They will still bite and have a mouth full of sharp, small teeth, & he said.

& # 39; The python looks like it was just exploring and it is common for them to venture into houses. & # 39;

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