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NSW is hit with more restrictions on mass gatherings

Stricter restrictions on gatherings will be announced for New South Wales – but Prime Minister insists she will NOT re-imprison the state

  • NSW will impose stricter restrictions on mass gatherings and indoors
  • The number is expected to decrease at churches, funerals and weddings
  • NSW has seen a jump in cases following an outbreak at the Crossroads Hotel
  • Prime Minister Gladys Berejiklian said she will prevent the state from being put back in a closed state

New South Wales may face more severe restrictions in the coming days, but Prime Minister Gladys Berejiklian says he has no intention of locking the state.

The state government is expected to reduce the number at mass gatherings, including those at churches, funerals, and weddings.

The reductions are expected to be only minor, as there is not yet an outbreak of the coronavirus caused by those activities, Seven News reported.

It’s because stricter measures are being imposed on pubs and clubs across NSW.

New South Wales may be hit by more severe restrictions due to a wave of cases in the coming days. Pictured COVID-19 testing clinic in Picton, Sydney

New South Wales may be hit by more severe restrictions due to a wave of cases in the coming days. Pictured COVID-19 testing clinic in Picton, Sydney

Despite a jump in COVID-19 cases, Prime Minister Gladys Berejiklian refuses to lock NSW again. Pictured dinners at Speedos Cafe in Bondi

Despite a jump in COVID-19 cases, Prime Minister Gladys Berejiklian refuses to lock NSW again. Pictured dinners at Speedos Cafe in Bondi

Despite a jump in COVID-19 cases, Prime Minister Gladys Berejiklian refuses to lock NSW again. Pictured dinners at Speedos Cafe in Bondi

As of Thursday midnight, the locations have a maximum number of 300 people and halve group bookings from 20 to 10.

Marshalls are also required in locations to ensure they follow a COVID-safe plan.

Each cafe visitor must also register on arrival and provide their details in case contact tracking is to be performed.

On Thursday, New South Wales registered ten new cases across the state, including four returning travelers and three infections related to the Crossroads hotel.

The source of the three other cases remains a mystery and is currently under investigation by NSW Health.

The Crossroads Hotel outbreak, which has spread to 40 people, started after an infected man from Melbourne visited the hotel on July 3.

NSW health minister Brad Hazzard revealed on Thursday that one of the hotel’s cases had the largest number of virus particles in his body that the authorities have seen so far.

The NSW government is expected to reduce the number of meetings in churches. Portrayed photos of Mary Immaculate Church members are seen on chairs when church services were banned in April

The NSW government is expected to reduce the number of meetings in churches. Portrayed photos of Mary Immaculate Church members are seen on chairs when church services were banned in April

The NSW government is expected to reduce the number of meetings in churches. Portrayed photos of Mary Immaculate Church members are seen on chairs when church services were banned in April

“We have a young guy from that last cluster … he had one of the highest levels of infection we’ve ever seen,” Hazzard told Ben Fordham about 2GB.

“His viral load was quite capable of spreading it to everyone around him … we should all be on our guard.”

But despite the leap in business, Ms Berejiklian is adamant that the state will avoid a second shutdown.

“We can’t keep locking and we should avoid that at all costs,” she told KIIS radio.

Asked if Sydney would be locked up if it saw the same contamination numbers, Ms Berejiklian said, “We would prevent this from happening.”

She also ruled out suburban to suburban closures, as she tried in 12 zip codes in northwest Melbourne.

Ms Berejiklian said it is not effective to shut down a suburb where an outbreak is occurring because people who may be infected there travel ‘all over Sydney’.

“It’s all or nothing. You can’t close a suburb, because [people who have passed through] live somewhere else, “she said.

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