Home Australia Now that’s a harvest! Archaeologists discover the “oldest wine in the world” while excavating a Roman tomb in Spain: a 2,000-year-old drink is found in a funerary urn mixed with human remains

Now that’s a harvest! Archaeologists discover the “oldest wine in the world” while excavating a Roman tomb in Spain: a 2,000-year-old drink is found in a funerary urn mixed with human remains

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Discovered in Carmona (pictured) in the southern region of Andalusia, the wine is believed to be the oldest ever found and was preserved in liquid form.

The 2,000-year-old drink was found in a funeral urn mixed with cremated human remains.

Discovered in Carmona, in the southern region of Andalusia, the wine is believed to be the oldest ever found and was preserved in liquid form.

Analysis of the liquid inside the urn concluded that it was white wine despite its dark color, as it did not contain the polyphenols found in the skins of the grapes used to produce red wine.

In a published report on the discovery, scientists added that the liquid was similar to fine wines produced today in the same region.

Juan Manuel Román, archaeologist and co-author of the wine report published in the Journal of Archaeological Science, said: “It was very surprising because when we found the urns during an excavation, we assumed they contained bones and graves.” products, but we never imagined that there could be liquid inside.

Discovered in Carmona (pictured) in the southern region of Andalusia, the wine is believed to be the oldest ever found and was preserved in liquid form.

Analysis of the liquid inside the urn concluded that it was white wine despite its dark color, as it did not contain the polyphenols found in the skins of the grapes used to produce red wine.

Analysis of the liquid inside the urn concluded that it was white wine despite its dark color, as it did not contain the polyphenols found in the skins of the grapes used to produce red wine.

A gold ring was also found in the dark reddish liquid that filled to the brim of the urn (pictured).

A gold ring was also found in the dark reddish liquid that filled to the brim of the urn (pictured).

According to expert analysis, the cremated remains found in the wine are believed to belong to a 45-year-old man.

A gold ring was also found in the dark reddish liquid that was filled to the brim of the urn.

The Roman mausoleum of Carmona was discovered in 2019 during the renovation of a house and contained funerary urns along with the remains of a man and a woman.

The use of wine was a common custom in ancient Roman burials, and experts suggest that wine would have been part of a ritual to help the deceased pass into the afterlife.

However, the practice of mixing remains with wine was unprecedented until now, as no other wine had been so well preserved for 2,000 years.

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