Novak Djokovic’s visa revoked three days before Australian Open

Last desperate Djokovic! The world’s number 1 visa has been revoked AGAIN three days before the Australian Open as Novak fights on in court…

  • Novak Djokovic nervously waits to discover his fate at the Australian Open
  • The Serb’s visa was revoked again on Friday, but his lawyers appealed
  • World No. 1 Djokovic to spend weekend in immigration detention center
  • The legal proceedings in the Djokovic case will be concluded on Sunday



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Novak Djokovic will spend the weekend in immigration detention in Melbourne as he makes a last ditch effort to compete in the Australian Open.

The world’s No. 1 visa was canceled for the second time on Friday as the chaos he brought to the tournament continued. Djokovic’s lawyers immediately appealed the Australian government’s ruling regarding his Covid violations.

Rather than being on the practice courts for his title defense, Djokovic had to spend more time with his lawyers and in a secure hotel as they made a last ditch effort to allow him to stay and compete.

With the tournament starting its half of the draw on Monday and the legal proceedings not closing until Sunday, he was able to go almost straight from one court to another. But that would depend on a new judge again overturning the decision to expel him.

Never in tennis history has there been a build-up to a Grand Slam like this, with a nine-time champion causing maximum chaos through his determination to find a vaccine loophole.

Novak Djokovic spends weekend in detention center after his visa is revoked

Novak Djokovic spends weekend in detention center after his visa is revoked

Djokovic to be held downtown in the final days before the Australian Open kicks off

Djokovic to be held downtown in the final days before the Australian Open kicks off

Djokovic to be held downtown in the final days before the Australian Open kicks off

Whatever happens to his profession, Djokovic’s preparations for the tournament have been severely hampered, although he has an ideal first round match against Miomir Kecmanovic, a relatively inexperienced compatriot on Monday night, local time.

It all remains dependent on whether his excellent legal team can overturn Immigration Secretary Alex Hawke’s decision to deport him.

Should the decision be against Djokovic, it would come with a three-year ban from setting foot in the country – although the government has the power to waive it.

His verdict was delivered in a restrained manner late in the afternoon in Australia on Friday, with the delay frustrating Djokovic’s lawyers, who immediately appealed.

Djokovic's lawyers (pictured: their Melbourne office) appealed after the latest twist

Djokovic's lawyers (pictured: their Melbourne office) appealed after the latest twist

Djokovic’s lawyers (pictured: their Melbourne office) appealed after the latest twist

At 8:45 p.m., they had arranged an emergency hearing to prevent him from being evicted. That ended at 11 p.m. when the player was told he would be formally detained nine hours later in an undisclosed location to avoid a media and public circus.

Djokovic should finally find out his fate on Sunday night, although everything is in the hands of Judge O’Callaghan, of the Federal Court. Hawke ended a four-day waiting period by announcing that he would revoke the world’s No. 1 visa “for reasons of health and good order, on the basis that it was in the public interest to do so.” to do’.

Djokovic’s lawyer Nick Wood later told the court that its basis was essentially that his continued presence would arouse anti-vaccine sentiments.

While the scope of the government’s case was not immediately clear, Wood added that they would attack the minister’s reasoning, which he described as “clearly irrational”.

Djokovic faces a nervous waiting game to find out if he can compete in Melbourne

Djokovic faces a nervous waiting game to find out if he can compete in Melbourne

Djokovic faces a nervous waiting game to find out if he can compete in Melbourne

Legal observers in Australia pointed out that this case was very different from Monday’s, when Djokovic was initially granted a stay of execution. Due to the personal powers of the minister, the government has a lower threshold to convince the judge of its technical argument that he should not stay.

Forcing Djokovic to leave the country would play well with the Australian public, who, according to polls, would like to see that happen by a majority of about four to one.

However, Djokovic’s team will say he is in “good reputation” and poses no threat to the population, despite discrepancies in his visa application. If he wins his appeal, it seems unlikely the government will try to kick him out again.

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